Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/egusphere-2024-1684
https://doi.org/10.5194/egusphere-2024-1684
27 Jun 2024
 | 27 Jun 2024
Status: this preprint is open for discussion and under review for Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics (ACP).

Global carbon emission accounting: national-level assessment of wildfire CO2 emission – a case study of China

Xuehong Gong, Zeyu Liu, Jie Tian, Qiyuan Wang, Guohui Li, Zhisheng An, and Yongming Han

Abstract. Wildfires release large amounts of greenhouse gases into the atmosphere, exacerbating climate change and causing severe impacts on air quality and human health. Including carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from wildfires in international assessments and national emission reduction responsibilities is crucial for global carbon reduction and environmental governance. In this study, based on a bottom-up approach and using satellite data, combined with emission factor and aboveground biomass data for different vegetation cover types (forest, shrub, grassland, cropland), the dynamic changes in CO2 emissions from wildfires in China from 2001 to 2022 were analyzed. The results showed that between 2001 and 2022, the total CO2 emissions from wildfires in China were 693.7 Tg (1 Tg = 1012 g), with an annual average of 31.5 Tg. The CO2 emissions from cropland and forest fires were relatively high, accounting for 46 % and 32 %, respectively. The yearly variation in CO2 emissions from forest and shrub fires showed a significant downward trend, while emissions from grassland fires remained relatively stable. In contrast, the CO2 emissions from cropland fires showed a clear upward trend. High CO2 emissions from wildfires were mainly concentrated in the eastern regions of Heilongjiang and Inner Mongolia Provinces in China, accounting for 44 % of the total annual emissions. Various factors such as daily cumulative sunshine hours (Spearman’s correlation coefficient, forest: -0.41, shrub:0.25; p < 0.001) and the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI; Spearman’s correlation coefficient, forest: -0.35, shrub: 0.37; p < 0.001), influenced CO2 emissions from forest and shrub fires. Moreover, temperature (Spearman’s correlation coefficient, -0.45, p < 0.001) primarily affected CO2 emissions from grassland fires. The CO2 emissions from cropland fires negatively correlated with the gross domestic product (GDP) (Spearman’s correlation coefficient, -0.52, p < 0.001) and population density (Spearman’s correlation coefficient, -0.51, p < 0.001). China's policy management has been crucial in reducing CO2 emissions from wildfires. By accurately assessing CO2 emissions from wildfires, governments worldwide can better set CO2 reduction targets, take corresponding measures, and contribute to the global response to climate change.

Publisher's note: Copernicus Publications remains neutral with regard to jurisdictional claims made in the text, published maps, institutional affiliations, or any other geographical representation in this preprint. The responsibility to include appropriate place names lies with the authors.
Xuehong Gong, Zeyu Liu, Jie Tian, Qiyuan Wang, Guohui Li, Zhisheng An, and Yongming Han

Status: open (until 08 Aug 2024)

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse
Xuehong Gong, Zeyu Liu, Jie Tian, Qiyuan Wang, Guohui Li, Zhisheng An, and Yongming Han
Xuehong Gong, Zeyu Liu, Jie Tian, Qiyuan Wang, Guohui Li, Zhisheng An, and Yongming Han

Viewed

Total article views: 168 (including HTML, PDF, and XML)
HTML PDF XML Total Supplement BibTeX EndNote
129 28 11 168 17 7 7
  • HTML: 129
  • PDF: 28
  • XML: 11
  • Total: 168
  • Supplement: 17
  • BibTeX: 7
  • EndNote: 7
Views and downloads (calculated since 27 Jun 2024)
Cumulative views and downloads (calculated since 27 Jun 2024)

Viewed (geographical distribution)

Total article views: 138 (including HTML, PDF, and XML) Thereof 138 with geography defined and 0 with unknown origin.
Country # Views %
  • 1
1
 
 
 
 
Latest update: 24 Jul 2024
Download
Short summary
Our study analyzed CO2 emissions from wildfires in China from 2001 to 2022. Cropland and forest fires contributed the most, while grassland fires were the least. Emissions from forest and shrub fires decreased significantly, while cropland fires increased. The highest emissions were in Heilongjiang and Inner Mongolia. China's effective policy management has reduced wildfire-related CO2 emissions, aiding global climate change efforts.