Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/egusphere-2022-235
https://doi.org/10.5194/egusphere-2022-235
 
09 May 2022
09 May 2022
Status: this preprint is open for discussion.

The impacts of secondary ice production on microphysics and dynamics in tropical convection

Zhipeng Qu1, Alexei Korolev1, Jason A. Milbrandt2, Ivan Heckman1, Yongjie Huang3, Greg M. McFarquhar4,5, Hugh Morrison6, Mengistu Wolde7, and Cuong Nguyen7 Zhipeng Qu et al.
  • 1Meteorological Research Division, Environment and Climate Change Canada, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
  • 2Meteorological Research Division, Environment and Climate Change Canada, Dorval, Quebec, Canada
  • 3Center for Analysis and Prediction of Storms, University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK, USA
  • 4Cooperative Institute for Severe and High Impact Weather Research and Operations, University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK, USA
  • 5School of Meteorology, University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK, USA
  • 6Mesoscale and Microscale Meteorology Laboratory, National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO, USA
  • 7National Research Council Canada, Ottawa, Canada

Abstract. Secondary ice production (SIP) is an important physical phenomenon that results in an increase of ice particle concentration and can therefore have a significant impact on the evolution of clouds. In this study, idealized simulations of a mesoscale convective systems (MCS) was conducted using a high-resolution (250-m horizontal grid spacing) mesoscale model and a detailed bulk microphysics scheme in order to examine the impacts of SIP on the microphysics and dynamics of a simulated tropical MCS. The simulations were compared to airborne in situ and remote sensing observations collected during the High Altitude Ice Crystals – High Ice Water Content (HAIC-HIWC) field campaign in 2015. It was found that simulated ice particle size distributions are highly sensitive to the parameterization of SIP. Inclusion of SIP processes in the microphysics scheme is crucial for the production and maintenance of high ice water content in the simulated tropical convection. It was shown that SIP can enhance the strength of the existing convective updrafts and result in the initiation of new updrafts above the melting layer. Agreement between the simulations and observations highlights the impacts of SIP on the maintenance of tropical MCSs in nature and the importance of including SIP parameterizations in models.

Zhipeng Qu et al.

Status: open (until 20 Jun 2022)

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Zhipeng Qu et al.

Zhipeng Qu et al.

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Short summary
Secondary ice production (SIP) is an important physical phenomenon that results in an increase of cloud ice particle concentration and can have a significant impact on the evolution of clouds. In this study, idealized simulations of a tropical convective was conducted. Agreement between the simulations and observations highlights the impacts of SIP on the maintenance of tropical convection in nature and the importance of including the modeling of SIP in numerical weather prediction models.