Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/egusphere-2024-1576
https://doi.org/10.5194/egusphere-2024-1576
01 Jul 2024
 | 01 Jul 2024
Status: this preprint is open for discussion and under review for Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics (ACP).

Insights on ozone pollution control in urban areas by decoupling meteorological factors based on machine learning

Yuqing Qiu, Xin Li, Wenxuan Chai, Yi Liu, Mengdi Song, Xudong Tian, Qiaoli Zou, Wenjun Lou, Wangyao Zhang, Juan Li, and Yuanhang Zhang

Abstract. Ozone (O3) pollution is posing significant challenges to urban air quality improvement in China. The formation of surface O3 is intricately linked to chemical reactions which are influenced by both meteorological conditions and local emissions of precursors (i.e., NOx and VOCs). The atmospheric environment capacity decreases when meteorological conditions deteriorate, resulting in the accumulation of air pollutants. Although a series of emission reduction measures have been implemented in urban areas, the effectiveness of O₃ pollution control proves inadequate. Primarily due to adverse changes in meteorological conditions, the effects of emission reduction are masked. In this study, we integrated machine learning model, the observation-based model and the positive matrix factorization model based on four years of continuous observation data from a typical urban site. We found that transport and dispersion impact the distribution of O3 concentration. During the warm season, positive contributions of dispersion and transport to O3 concentration ranged from 12.9 % to 24.0 %. After meteorological normalization, the sensitivity of O3 formation and the source apportionment of VOCs changed. The sensitivity of O3 formation changed from the NOx-limited regime to the transition regime between VOC- and NOx-limited regimes during the O3 pollution event. Vehicle exhaust became the primary source of VOC emissions after removing the effect of dispersion, contributing 41.8 % to VOCs during the pollution periods. On the contrary, the contribution of combustion to VOCs decreased from 33.7 % to 25.1 %. Our results provided new recommendations and insights for implementing O3 pollution control measures and evaluating the effectiveness of emission reduction in urban areas.

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Yuqing Qiu, Xin Li, Wenxuan Chai, Yi Liu, Mengdi Song, Xudong Tian, Qiaoli Zou, Wenjun Lou, Wangyao Zhang, Juan Li, and Yuanhang Zhang

Status: open (until 12 Aug 2024)

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Yuqing Qiu, Xin Li, Wenxuan Chai, Yi Liu, Mengdi Song, Xudong Tian, Qiaoli Zou, Wenjun Lou, Wangyao Zhang, Juan Li, and Yuanhang Zhang
Yuqing Qiu, Xin Li, Wenxuan Chai, Yi Liu, Mengdi Song, Xudong Tian, Qiaoli Zou, Wenjun Lou, Wangyao Zhang, Juan Li, and Yuanhang Zhang

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Short summary
The chemical reactions of ozone (O3) formation are related to meteorology and local emissions. Here, a random forest approach was used to eliminate the effects of meteorological factors (dispersion or transport) on O3 and its precursors. Variations in the sensitivity of O3 formation and the apportionment of emission sources were revealed after meteorological normalization. Our results suggest that meteorological variations should be considered when diagnosing O3 formation.