Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/egusphere-2024-1414
https://doi.org/10.5194/egusphere-2024-1414
27 Jun 2024
 | 27 Jun 2024
Status: this preprint is open for discussion.

Resolution dependence of interlinked Southern Ocean biases in global coupled HadGEM3 models

David Storkey, Pierre Mathiot, Michael J. Bell, Dan Copsey, Catherine Guiavarc'h, Helene T. Hewitt, Jeff Ridley, and Malcolm J. Roberts

Abstract. The early spin up of the HadGEM3 coupled model displays large-scale biases in the Southern Ocean at eddy- permitting ocean resolution: The subpolar gyres and Antarctic Slope Current (ASC) are too active; the Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC) transport is too weak; and there are large-scale water mass biases on the Antarctic shelf and in the open ocean. Most of the biases persist for at least 100 years of the model spin up. This set of biases is largely absent with a non- eddying ocean model and reduced with an eddy-rich ocean model. We show that damping the gyres and the ASC in the eddy-permitting model, either by introducing a parametrisation of baroclinic instability or by changing the lateral momentum boundary condition to increase bathymetric drag, acts to alleviate all the biases. This suggests that the fundamental issue in the eddy-permitting model may be to do with unresolved eddy processes or the representation of bathymetric drag on the flow. We investigate the structure of the biases in more detail and show that the eddy-permitting model has steep isopycnals near the Antarctic shelf slope consistent with a strong ASC and reduced transport of Circumpolar Deep Water (CDW) onto the shelf. However, across the region of the ACC jets the eddy-permitting model has shallower isopycnal slopes than the other models, consistent with a weaker ACC transport and warm near-surface biases in the open ocean.

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David Storkey, Pierre Mathiot, Michael J. Bell, Dan Copsey, Catherine Guiavarc'h, Helene T. Hewitt, Jeff Ridley, and Malcolm J. Roberts

Status: open (until 22 Aug 2024)

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David Storkey, Pierre Mathiot, Michael J. Bell, Dan Copsey, Catherine Guiavarc'h, Helene T. Hewitt, Jeff Ridley, and Malcolm J. Roberts
David Storkey, Pierre Mathiot, Michael J. Bell, Dan Copsey, Catherine Guiavarc'h, Helene T. Hewitt, Jeff Ridley, and Malcolm J. Roberts

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Short summary
The Southern Ocean is a key region of the world ocean in the context of climate change studies. We show that the HadGEM3 coupled model with intermediate ocean resolution struggles to accurately simulate the Southern Ocean. Increasing the frictional drag that the sea floor exerts on ocean currents, and introducing a representation of unresolved ocean eddies both appear to reduce the large-scale biases in this model.