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https://doi.org/10.5194/egusphere-2023-1605
https://doi.org/10.5194/egusphere-2023-1605
15 Aug 2023
 | 15 Aug 2023

Global and Indian precipitation responses to anthropogenic aerosol and carbon dioxide forcings from PDRMIP experiments

Sushant Das, Frida Bender, and Thorsten Mauritsen

Abstract. Global precipitation change in response to climate change is closely related to surface temperature, the forcing agent, and the atmospheric dry energy budget, but regional precipitation change is more complex. In this study, we use experiments from the Precipitation Driver and Response Model Intercomparison Project (PDRMIP) wherein carbon dioxide, sulfate aerosols, and black carbon aerosols are perturbed to study the global precipitation response in contrast with the regional response over India. The response to global warming from carbon dioxide increases precipitation both globally and regionally, whereas the cooling response to sulfate aerosol leads to a reduction in precipitation in both cases. The response to black carbon aerosols, however, is a global decrease but a regional increase of precipitation over India. The mechanism is increased atmospheric heating driving a stronger monsoon circulation and stronger low-level winds. This intensification of the Indian monsoon is, somewhat surprisingly, stronger for global black carbon emissions than when the emissions are limited to those from the Asian region. Overall, our study presents heterogeneity in precipitation responses at both global and regional levels and the potential underlying physical processes under a variety of climate forcings that would be useful in designing further model experiments with higher spatial resolution.

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Sushant Das, Frida Bender, and Thorsten Mauritsen

Status: final response (author comments only)

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse
  • RC1: 'Comment on egusphere-2023-1605', Anonymous Referee #2, 22 Aug 2023
    • AC1: 'Reply on RC1', Sushant Das, 19 Jan 2024
  • RC2: 'Comment on egusphere-2023-1605', Anonymous Referee #1, 25 Aug 2023
    • AC3: 'Reply on RC2', Sushant Das, 19 Jan 2024
  • RC3: 'Comment on egusphere-2023-1605', Anonymous Referee #3, 01 Sep 2023
    • AC2: 'Reply on RC3', Sushant Das, 19 Jan 2024
Sushant Das, Frida Bender, and Thorsten Mauritsen
Sushant Das, Frida Bender, and Thorsten Mauritsen

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Short summary
Quantifying global and Indian precipitation responses to anthropogenic aerosol and CO2 forcings using multiple models is needed for reducing climate uncertainty. The response to global warming from CO2 increases precipitation both globally and over India, whereas the cooling response to sulfate aerosol leads to a reduction in precipitation in both cases. An opposite response to black carbon is noted i.e., a global decrease but an increase of precipitation over India implying changes in dynamics.