Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/egusphere-2022-1498
https://doi.org/10.5194/egusphere-2022-1498
 
13 Jan 2023
13 Jan 2023
Status: this preprint is open for discussion.

Mineral compounds in oak waterlogged archaeological wood and volcanic lake compartments

Giancarlo Sidoti1, Federica Antonelli2, Giulia Galotta2, Cristina Moscatelli3, Davor Kržišnik4, Vittorio Vinciguerra3, Swati Tamantini3, Rosita Marabottini3, Natalia Macro1, and Manuela Romagnoli3 Giancarlo Sidoti et al.
  • 1Ministry of Culture, Central Institute for Restoration, ICR, Chemistry and material testing laboratory, Via di San Michele 25, 00153, Rome, Italy
  • 2Ministry of Culture, Central Institute for Restoration, ICR, Biology laboratory, Via di San Michele 25, 00153, Rome, Italy
  • 3University of Tuscia, Department for Innovation in Biological, Agro-food and Forest systems, DIBAF, S. Camillo de Lellis snc, 01100, Viterbo, Italy
  • 4University of Ljubljana, Biotechnical Faculty, Jamnikarjeva 101, SI-1000 Ljubljana, Slovenia

Abstract. Waterlogged archaeological wood (WAW) is a rare and precious organic material that can hold outstanding cultural values. In order to protect WAW for the next generations, this material must be accurately characterized to set its proper conservation, storage and exhibition conditions in museum environments. In this study, the mineral content found in WAW retrieved in a volcanic lake, was investigated by analysing wood ash through scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersion spectroscopy (SEM-EDS). This micro-destructive approach was coupled with morphological studies carried out through optical microscopy. SEM-EDS was also performed on the WAW and on the surrounding sediment, to study the possible correlation between the mineral composition and the wood degradation state. The analysis revealed that calcium was the most abundant element in all poles with weight percentages ranging between 24 % and 42 %. This element was more represented in heartwood (HW) than sapwood (SW). In Sapwood the second most abundant element was arsenic. Sulphur, iron, and potassium were also present in all the analysed samples. Arsenic was detected also in the sediments; it was particularly concentrated in the samples taken near archaeological wood. The presence of this element can be linked to the volcanic origin of the lake, and its high concentration points to bioaccumulation processes induced by bacteria (erosion bacteria and sulphate-reducing bacteria) and biochemical processes favouring precipitation of insoluble compounds. The present work is the first investigation on mineral content in archaeological wood establishing a possible correlation with the surrounding volcanic lake sediments.

Giancarlo Sidoti et al.

Status: open (until 24 Feb 2023)

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Giancarlo Sidoti et al.

Giancarlo Sidoti et al.

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Short summary
The mineral content in archaeological wood pile dwellings and in the sorrounding sediments in a volcanic lake, was investigated . Calcium was the most abundant element, the second most abundant element was arsenic in sapwood. Sulphur, iron, and potassium were also present. The mineral compounds are linked to the volcanic origin of the lake, to bioaccumulation processes induced by bacteria (i.e. sulphate-reducing bacteria) and biochemical processes.