Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/egusphere-2024-95
https://doi.org/10.5194/egusphere-2024-95
16 Jan 2024
 | 16 Jan 2024
Status: this preprint is open for discussion.

Experimental design for the marine ice sheet and ocean model intercomparison project – phase 2 (MISOMIP2)

Jan De Rydt, Nicolas C. Jourdain, Yoshihiro Nakayama, Mathias van Caspel, Ralph Timmermann, Pierre Mathiot, Xylar S. Asay-Davis, Hélène Seroussi, Pierre Dutrieux, Ben Galton-Fenzi, David Holland, and Ronja Reese

Abstract. The Marine Ice Sheet and Ocean Model Intercomparison Project – phase 2 (MISOMIP2) is a natural progression of previous and ongoing model intercomparison exercises that have focused on the simulation of ice-sheet and ocean processes in Antarctica. The previous exercises motivate the move towards realistic configurations as well as more diverse model parameters and resolutions. The main objective of MISOMIP2 is to investigate the performance of existing ocean and coupled ice-sheet–ocean models in a range of Antarctic environments, through comparisons to observational data. We will assess the status of ice-sheet–ocean modelling as a community and identify common characteristics of models that are best able to capture observed features. As models are highly tuned based on present-day data, we will also compare their sensitivity to prescribed abrupt atmospheric perturbations leading to either very warm or slightly warmer ocean conditions compared to present-day. The approach of MISOMIP2 is to welcome contributions of models as they are, including global and regional configurations, but we request standardised variables and common grids for the outputs. We target the analysis on two specific regions, the Amundsen Sea and the Weddell Sea, since they describe two different ocean environments and have been relatively well observed compared to other areas of Antarctica. An observational "MIPkit" synthesizing existing ocean and ice sheet observations for a common period is provided to evaluate ocean and ice sheet models in these two regions.

Jan De Rydt, Nicolas C. Jourdain, Yoshihiro Nakayama, Mathias van Caspel, Ralph Timmermann, Pierre Mathiot, Xylar S. Asay-Davis, Hélène Seroussi, Pierre Dutrieux, Ben Galton-Fenzi, David Holland, and Ronja Reese

Status: open (until 12 Mar 2024)

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse
  • RC1: 'Comment on egusphere-2024-95', Anonymous Referee #1, 13 Feb 2024 reply
  • RC2: 'Comment on egusphere-2024-95', Anonymous Referee #2, 16 Feb 2024 reply
Jan De Rydt, Nicolas C. Jourdain, Yoshihiro Nakayama, Mathias van Caspel, Ralph Timmermann, Pierre Mathiot, Xylar S. Asay-Davis, Hélène Seroussi, Pierre Dutrieux, Ben Galton-Fenzi, David Holland, and Ronja Reese

Data sets

MISOMIP2 MIPkit data Nicolas Jourdain, Yoshihiro Nakayama, Mathias van Caspel, Jan De Rydt, and Ralph Timmermann https://zenodo.org/communities/misomip2

Model code and software

MISOMIP2 ocean data processing scripts Nicolas Jourdain, Jan De Rydt, Yoshihiro Nakayama, and Ole Richter https://github.com/misomip/misomip2

Jan De Rydt, Nicolas C. Jourdain, Yoshihiro Nakayama, Mathias van Caspel, Ralph Timmermann, Pierre Mathiot, Xylar S. Asay-Davis, Hélène Seroussi, Pierre Dutrieux, Ben Galton-Fenzi, David Holland, and Ronja Reese

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Short summary
Global climate models do not reliably simulate sea-level change arising from ice sheet-ocean interactions. We propose a community modelling effort to conduct a series of well-defined experiments to compare models with observations, and study how models respond to a range of perturbations in climate and ice-sheet geometry. The 2nd Marine Ice Sheet Ocean Model Intercomparison Project, will continue to lay the groundwork for including ice sheet-ocean interactions in global scale, IPCC class models.