Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/egusphere-2024-405
https://doi.org/10.5194/egusphere-2024-405
15 Mar 2024
 | 15 Mar 2024

Emissions of Methane from Coal, Thermal power plants and Wetlands and its implications on Atmospheric Methane across the South Asian Region

Mahalakshmi D.Venkata, Mahesh Pathakoti, A. Lakshmi Kanchana, Sujatha Peethani, Ibrahim Shaik, Krishnan Sundara Rajan, Vijay Kumar Sagar, Pushpanathan Raja, Yogesh Kumar Tiwari, and Chauhan Prakash

Abstract. Atmospheric methane (CH4) is a potent climate change agent responsible for a fraction of global warming. The present study investigated the spatial and temporal variability of atmospheric column-averaged (X) CH4 (XCH4) concentrations using Greenhouse gases Observing SATellite (GOSAT) and TROPOspheric Monitoring Instrument onboard the Sentienl-5 Precursor (S5P/TROPOMI) data from 2009 to 2022 over the South Asia region. During the study period, the long-term trends in XCH4 increased from 1700 ppb to 1950 ppb with an annual growth rate of 8.76 ppb year-1. Among all natural and anthropogenic sources of CH4, the rate of increase in XCH4 was higher over the Mundra thermal power station and Mundra ultra mega power plant at about 9.62 ppb year-1, followed by the coal site at about 8.76 ppb year-1 (Korba). With a growth rate of 8.61 ppb year-1, the Sundarbans natural wetland competes with coal sites, producing over 30 MT, indicating an equivalent anthropogenic source. For the 15 Indian Agroclimatic zones, significant high emissions of CH4 were observed over the Middle Gangetic Plains (MGP), Trans Gangetic Plains (TGP), Upper Gangetic Plains (UGP), East Coast Plains & Hills (ECPH), Lower Gangetic Plains (LGP) and East Gangetic Plains (EGP). Further, the bottom-up anthropogenic CH4 emissions data are mapped against the XCH4 concentrations and found high correlation in the Indo Gangetic Plains (IGP) region, indicating the hotspots of anthropogenic CH4. The present study highlighted the impact of natural and anthropogenic sources of XCH4 and quantified the spatio-temporal changes in XCH4 at each study site over the Indian region.

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Mahalakshmi D.Venkata, Mahesh Pathakoti, A. Lakshmi Kanchana, Sujatha Peethani, Ibrahim Shaik, Krishnan Sundara Rajan, Vijay Kumar Sagar, Pushpanathan Raja, Yogesh Kumar Tiwari, and Chauhan Prakash

Status: final response (author comments only)

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse
  • RC1: 'Comment on egusphere-2024-405', Anonymous Referee #1, 27 Mar 2024
    • AC3: 'Reply on RC1', Mahesh Pathakoti, 27 May 2024
  • RC2: 'Comment on egusphere-2024-405', Anonymous Referee #2, 23 Apr 2024
    • AC1: 'Reply on RC2', Mahesh Pathakoti, 27 May 2024
    • AC2: 'Reply on RC2', Mahesh Pathakoti, 27 May 2024
Mahalakshmi D.Venkata, Mahesh Pathakoti, A. Lakshmi Kanchana, Sujatha Peethani, Ibrahim Shaik, Krishnan Sundara Rajan, Vijay Kumar Sagar, Pushpanathan Raja, Yogesh Kumar Tiwari, and Chauhan Prakash
Mahalakshmi D.Venkata, Mahesh Pathakoti, A. Lakshmi Kanchana, Sujatha Peethani, Ibrahim Shaik, Krishnan Sundara Rajan, Vijay Kumar Sagar, Pushpanathan Raja, Yogesh Kumar Tiwari, and Chauhan Prakash

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Short summary
The present study investigated the variability of CH4 over coal fields, power plants, and wetlands using the long-term GOSAT and TROPOMI data. Interestingly noticed a slow growth rate of CH4 over the second-largest wetland areas of India. The Sundarbans wetland growth rate competes with coal sites with the production of over 30 MT. Further mapped CH4 concentrations against the emissions in the Agro-climatic zones and found a statistically high correlation in the Indo-Gangetic Plain regions.