Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/egusphere-2024-2032
https://doi.org/10.5194/egusphere-2024-2032
08 Jul 2024
 | 08 Jul 2024
Status: this preprint is open for discussion and under review for Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics (ACP).

Atmospheric oxidation of 1,3-butadiene: influence of acidity and relative humidity on SOA composition and air toxic compounds

Mohammed Jaoui, Klara Nestorowicz, Krzysztof Rudzinski, Michael Lewandowski, Tadeusz Kleindienst, Julio Torres, Ewa Bulska, Witold Danikiewicz, and Rafal Szmigielski

Abstract. This study investigated the effect of relative humidity (RH) on the chemical composition of gas and particle phases formed from the photooxidation of 1,3-butadiene (13BD) in the presence of NOx under acidic and non-acidic conditions. The experiments were conducted in a 14.5 m3 smog chamber operated in a steady-state mode. Products were identified by high performance liquid chromatography, gas chromatography mass spectrometry and ultrahigh performance liquid chromatography coupled with high resolution mass spectrometry. More than 48 oxygenated products were identified including 33 oxygenated organics, 10 organosulfates (OSs), PAN, APAN, glyoxal, formaldehyde, and acrolein. Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) mass and reaction products were found to be dependent on RH and acidity of the aerosol. SOA mass, and most SOA products (i) were higher under acidic than non-acidic conditions, and (ii) decreased with increasing RH. Glyceric acid, threitols, threonic acids, four dimers, three unknowns, and four organosulfates were among the main species measured either under acidic or non-acidic conditions across all RH levels. Total secondary organic carbon and carbon yield decreased with increasing RH under both acidic and non-acidic conditions. The photochemical reactivity of 13BD in our systems decreased with increasing RH and was faster under non-acidic than acidic conditions. To determine the contribution of 13BD products to ambient aerosol, we analyzed PM2.5 samples collected at three European monitoring stations located in Poland. The occurrence of several 13BD SOA products (e.g., glyceric acid, tartronic acid, threonic acid, tartaric acid, and OSs) in the field samples suggests that 13BD could contribute to ambient aerosol formation.

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Mohammed Jaoui, Klara Nestorowicz, Krzysztof Rudzinski, Michael Lewandowski, Tadeusz Kleindienst, Julio Torres, Ewa Bulska, Witold Danikiewicz, and Rafal Szmigielski

Status: open (until 22 Aug 2024)

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Mohammed Jaoui, Klara Nestorowicz, Krzysztof Rudzinski, Michael Lewandowski, Tadeusz Kleindienst, Julio Torres, Ewa Bulska, Witold Danikiewicz, and Rafal Szmigielski
Mohammed Jaoui, Klara Nestorowicz, Krzysztof Rudzinski, Michael Lewandowski, Tadeusz Kleindienst, Julio Torres, Ewa Bulska, Witold Danikiewicz, and Rafal Szmigielski

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Short summary
Recent research has established the contribution of 1,3-butadiene (13BD) to organic aerosol formation with negative implications to urban air quality. Health effects studies have focused on whole particulate matter but compounds responsible for adverse health effects remain uncertain. This study provides the effect of relative humidity and acidity on the chemical composition of aerosol formed from 13BD photooxidation.