Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/egusphere-2024-1502
https://doi.org/10.5194/egusphere-2024-1502
23 May 2024
 | 23 May 2024
Status: this preprint is open for discussion and under review for Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics (ACP).

High ice-nucleating particle concentrations associated with Arctic haze in springtime cold-air outbreaks

Erin N. Raif, Sarah L. Barr, Mark D. Tarn, James B. McQuaid, Martin I. Daily, Steven J. Abel, Paul A. Barrett, Keith N. Bower, Paul R. Field, Kenneth S. Carslaw, and Benjamin J. Murray

Abstract. The global variation of ice-nucleating particle (INP) concentrations is an important modulator of the cloud-phase feedback, where the albedo of mixed-phase clouds increases in a warming climate. Shallow clouds such as those observed in cold-air outbreaks (CAOs) are particularly important for cloud-phase feedbacks and highly sensitive to INPs. To investigate the sources and concentrations of INPs in CAOs, we made airborne measurements over the Norwegian and Barents seas as part of the March 2022 Arctic Cold-Air Outbreak (ACAO) field campaign. Aerosol samples were collected on filters at locations above, below and upwind of CAO cloud decks. Throughout the campaign, INP concentrations were comparable to the highest previously observed in the Arctic. Scanning electron microscopy analysis of samples taken upwind of cloud decks showed that super-micron aerosol was dominated by mineral dusts. Analysis of aerosol particle size measurements to obtain an INP active site density suggested sea spray was unlikely to be the dominant INP type. These site densities were also too great for mineral components alone to be the dominant INP type above -20 °C. Accordingly, it is likely that the dominant INP type was mineral dust mixed with other ice nucleating materials, possibly of biogenic origin. Back-trajectory analysis and meteorological conditions suggested a lack of local INP sources. We therefore hypothesise that the high INP concentration is most likely to be associated with aged aerosol in Arctic haze that has undergone long-range transport from lower latitude regions.

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Erin N. Raif, Sarah L. Barr, Mark D. Tarn, James B. McQuaid, Martin I. Daily, Steven J. Abel, Paul A. Barrett, Keith N. Bower, Paul R. Field, Kenneth S. Carslaw, and Benjamin J. Murray

Status: open (until 06 Jul 2024)

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse
  • RC1: 'Comment on egusphere-2024-1502', Armin Sorooshian, 07 Jun 2024 reply
Erin N. Raif, Sarah L. Barr, Mark D. Tarn, James B. McQuaid, Martin I. Daily, Steven J. Abel, Paul A. Barrett, Keith N. Bower, Paul R. Field, Kenneth S. Carslaw, and Benjamin J. Murray

Data sets

ACAO INP Data and Metadata Erin Raif, Steven Abel, and Martin Daily https://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.11221599

erin-raif/acao_inp_arctic_haze Erin Raif https://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.11221399

ACAO Aircraft Data, flights c271-c279 Facility for Airborne and Atmospheric Measurements https://catalogue.ceda.ac.uk/uuid/01021a90c0c2481c909bdb145cb72398

ACAO Aircraft Data, flights c280-c282 Facility for Airborne and Atmospheric Measurements https://catalogue.ceda.ac.uk/uuid/6d7971a92d154bb29af3167dfb6f5a7e

Erin N. Raif, Sarah L. Barr, Mark D. Tarn, James B. McQuaid, Martin I. Daily, Steven J. Abel, Paul A. Barrett, Keith N. Bower, Paul R. Field, Kenneth S. Carslaw, and Benjamin J. Murray

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Short summary
Ice-nucleating particles (INPs) allow ice to form in clouds at temperatures warmer than -35°C. We measured INP concentrations over the Norwegian and Barents seas in weather events where cold air is ejected from the Arctic. These concentrations were among the highest measured in the Arctic and it is likely that the INPs were transported to the Arctic from distant regions. These results show it is important to consider hemispheric-scale INP processes to understand INP concentrations in the Arctic.