Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/egusphere-2024-1320
https://doi.org/10.5194/egusphere-2024-1320
14 May 2024
 | 14 May 2024
Status: this preprint is open for discussion.

Seasonal carbon fluxes from vegetation and soil in a Mediterranean non-tidal salt marsh

Lorena Carrasco-Barea, Dolors Verdaguer, Maria Gispert, Xavier D. Quintana, Hélène Bourhis, and Laura Llorens

Abstract. Salt marshes are important ecosystems for carbon sequestration. However, while studies of atmospheric carbon exchange fluxes have been broadly performed in tidal salt marshes, they are scarce in non-tidal salt marshes. In this study we measured, throughout one year, instantaneous net CO2 exchange rates from four halophytes (Sarcocornia fruticosa, Halimione portulacoides, Elytrigia atherica and Salicornia patula), which are dominant species of their corresponding habitat (an halophilous scrub, a salt meadow and a glasswort sward) of a Mediterranean non-tidal salt marsh. Soil CO2 and CH4 fluxes from these habitats were also measured. E. atherica, a perennial herbaceous species, showed the highest photosynthetic rates during the entire year, but S. patula, an annual succulent herb, had also remarkable photosynthetic rates in summer. Interestingly, the woody fraction of the two perennial shrubs, S. fruticosa and H. portulacoides, showed CO2 uptake during most of the daily measurements. Regarding the studied habitats, the halophilous scrub and the salt meadow showed higher soil CO2 emissions than the glasswort sward, being these values, in general, higher than those reported for tidal salt marshes. Both soil absorption and emission of CH4 were detected. In particular, CH4 emissions were remarkably high, similar to those found in low-salinity marshes, and, in general, higher than those reported for salt marshes with a high water table salinity. Soil mineralization quotients of the halophilous scrub and the salt meadow were lower than those measured at the glasswort sward, suggesting a higher soil carbon sequestration potential of the first two habitats.

Publisher's note: Copernicus Publications remains neutral with regard to jurisdictional claims made in the text, published maps, institutional affiliations, or any other geographical representation in this preprint. The responsibility to include appropriate place names lies with the authors.
Lorena Carrasco-Barea, Dolors Verdaguer, Maria Gispert, Xavier D. Quintana, Hélène Bourhis, and Laura Llorens

Status: open (until 25 Jun 2024)

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse
Lorena Carrasco-Barea, Dolors Verdaguer, Maria Gispert, Xavier D. Quintana, Hélène Bourhis, and Laura Llorens
Lorena Carrasco-Barea, Dolors Verdaguer, Maria Gispert, Xavier D. Quintana, Hélène Bourhis, and Laura Llorens

Viewed

Total article views: 53 (including HTML, PDF, and XML)
HTML PDF XML Total Supplement BibTeX EndNote
40 10 3 53 7 1 2
  • HTML: 40
  • PDF: 10
  • XML: 3
  • Total: 53
  • Supplement: 7
  • BibTeX: 1
  • EndNote: 2
Views and downloads (calculated since 14 May 2024)
Cumulative views and downloads (calculated since 14 May 2024)

Viewed (geographical distribution)

Total article views: 52 (including HTML, PDF, and XML) Thereof 52 with geography defined and 0 with unknown origin.
Country # Views %
  • 1
1
 
 
 
 
Latest update: 19 May 2024
Download
Short summary
Carbon dioxide fluxes have been measured seasonally in four plant species in a Mediterranean non-tidal salt marsh highlighting the high carbon removal potential that these species have. Carbon dioxide and methane emissions from soil showed high variability among the habitats studied and they were generally higher than those observed in tidal salt marshes. Our results are important to make more accurate predictions regarding carbon emissions from these ecosystems.