Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/egusphere-2024-1249
https://doi.org/10.5194/egusphere-2024-1249
13 May 2024
 | 13 May 2024
Status: this preprint is open for discussion.

Geophysical downhole logging analysis within the shallow depth ICDP STAR drilling project (Central Italy)

Paola Montone, Simona Pierdominici, Maria Teresa Mariucci, Francesco Mirabella, Marco Urbani, Assel Akimbekova, Lauro Chiaraluce, Wade Johnson, and Massimiliano Rinaldo Barchi

Abstract. The ICDP STAR drilling project aims to study the seismic and aseismic fault slip behaviour of the active low-angle Alto Tiberina normal Fault (ATF) in the Northern Apennines, Central Italy, drilling and instrumenting six shallow boreholes with seismometers and strainmeters. During the STAR field work, a geophysical downhole logging campaign was carried on defining the optimal target depth for instrument deployment and formation rock characterization. In particular, the main objectives of this study were to define in situ physical properties of the rocks and the tectonic discontinuity geometry along the boreholes. The downhole logging data provide new findings and knowledge especially with regards to the physical properties such as resistivity, gamma ray and wave velocity. The collected parameters were compared to the results of literature data collected in similar lithologies, as well as with the results of logging performed in deeper wells drilled for commercial purposes. The physical properties of the Mesozoic-Early Tertiary calcareous formations show low Gamma Ray values and high compressional (Vp) and shear wave (Vs) velocities (up to 5.3 km/s and 2.9 km/s, respectively), whereas the overlying clay-rich Late Tertiary formations exhibit high Gamma Ray and low resistivity and relatively low Vp and Vs values (up to 3.5 km/s and 2.0 km/s, respectively). The results obtained from the analysis of the orientations of the tectonic structures, measured along the six boreholes, show a good agreement with the orientations of the present-day extensional stress field, NE-SW oriented. Our study allowed to bridge the gap between the physical properties obtained from literature data and those obtained from the deep wells measurements, representing a possible case history for future projects. These new data will contribute to the advancement of knowledge of the physical properties of the rocks at shallow depths, typically overlooked.

Publisher's note: Copernicus Publications remains neutral with regard to jurisdictional claims made in the text, published maps, institutional affiliations, or any other geographical representation in this preprint. The responsibility to include appropriate place names lies with the authors.
Paola Montone, Simona Pierdominici, Maria Teresa Mariucci, Francesco Mirabella, Marco Urbani, Assel Akimbekova, Lauro Chiaraluce, Wade Johnson, and Massimiliano Rinaldo Barchi

Status: open (until 24 Jun 2024)

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse
Paola Montone, Simona Pierdominici, Maria Teresa Mariucci, Francesco Mirabella, Marco Urbani, Assel Akimbekova, Lauro Chiaraluce, Wade Johnson, and Massimiliano Rinaldo Barchi
Paola Montone, Simona Pierdominici, Maria Teresa Mariucci, Francesco Mirabella, Marco Urbani, Assel Akimbekova, Lauro Chiaraluce, Wade Johnson, and Massimiliano Rinaldo Barchi

Viewed

Total article views: 63 (including HTML, PDF, and XML)
HTML PDF XML Total Supplement BibTeX EndNote
42 18 3 63 10 1 1
  • HTML: 42
  • PDF: 18
  • XML: 3
  • Total: 63
  • Supplement: 10
  • BibTeX: 1
  • EndNote: 1
Views and downloads (calculated since 13 May 2024)
Cumulative views and downloads (calculated since 13 May 2024)

Viewed (geographical distribution)

Total article views: 61 (including HTML, PDF, and XML) Thereof 61 with geography defined and 0 with unknown origin.
Country # Views %
  • 1
1
 
 
 
 
Latest update: 19 May 2024
Download
Short summary
The STAR project set out to drill 6 shallow holes and use geophysical logging to figure out the best depth for placing seismometers and strainmeters, to image the upper crust and in particular the Alto Tiberina fault, Italy. These measurements give us a better idea of what the rocks are like, helping us connect what we know from literature with what we find underground, giving solid information on rock properties, which helps understand the first couple hundred meters of the Earth's crust.