Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/egusphere-2024-1202
https://doi.org/10.5194/egusphere-2024-1202
03 May 2024
 | 03 May 2024
Status: this preprint is open for discussion.

Upper ocean changes with hurricane-strength wind events: a study using Argo profiles and an ocean reanalysis

Jacopo Sala, Donata Giglio, Addison Hu, Mikael Kuusela, Kimberly M. Wood, and Ann B. Lee

Abstract. As the Earth’s climate is warming, the intensity and rain rate of tropical cyclones (TCs) is projected to increase. TCs intensify by extracting heat energy from the ocean, hence a better understanding of upper ocean changes with the TC passage is helpful to improve our understanding of air-sea interactions during and after the event. This work uses Argo float observations and the HYCOM ocean reanalysis to describe characteristics of upper ocean changes with hurricane-strength wind events. We study the association of upper ocean changes with the vertical structure of the salinity profile before the event (increasing versus decreasing), as well as the contribution of changes in salinity to upper ocean density changes in each case. Results show that in regions where pre-event salinity increases (decreases) with depth, there is a corresponding statistically significant increase (decrease) in upper ocean salinity. Consistent with previous studies, temperature decreases in both regions. As temperature decreases, upper ocean density increases and the increase is larger where pre-event salinity increases with depth. Changes in upper ocean properties (from Argo and HYCOM) are overall consistent with wind-driven vertical mixing of near-surface waters with colder and higher (or lower) salinity waters below. Resulting changes in ocean stratification have implications for air-sea interactions during and after the event, with potential impacts on weather events that follow.

Publisher's note: Copernicus Publications remains neutral with regard to jurisdictional claims made in the text, published maps, institutional affiliations, or any other geographical representation in this preprint. The responsibility to include appropriate place names lies with the authors.
Jacopo Sala, Donata Giglio, Addison Hu, Mikael Kuusela, Kimberly M. Wood, and Ann B. Lee

Status: open (until 28 Jun 2024)

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse
Jacopo Sala, Donata Giglio, Addison Hu, Mikael Kuusela, Kimberly M. Wood, and Ann B. Lee
Jacopo Sala, Donata Giglio, Addison Hu, Mikael Kuusela, Kimberly M. Wood, and Ann B. Lee

Viewed

Total article views: 156 (including HTML, PDF, and XML)
HTML PDF XML Total Supplement BibTeX EndNote
105 42 9 156 16 6 4
  • HTML: 105
  • PDF: 42
  • XML: 9
  • Total: 156
  • Supplement: 16
  • BibTeX: 6
  • EndNote: 4
Views and downloads (calculated since 03 May 2024)
Cumulative views and downloads (calculated since 03 May 2024)

Viewed (geographical distribution)

Total article views: 154 (including HTML, PDF, and XML) Thereof 154 with geography defined and 0 with unknown origin.
Country # Views %
  • 1
1
 
 
 
 
Latest update: 19 May 2024
Download
Short summary
As Earth’s climate warms, cyclone intensity and rain may rise. Cyclones, like hurricanes, gain strength from warm ocean waters. Understanding how oceans react to strong winds is vital. Our study highlights ocean responses to pre-storm salinity. Changes in salinity affect ocean during storms: salinity rises, temperature falls, density increases. The study suggests that mixing of near surface with deeper water may impact heat exchange between ocean and atmosphere during and after a weather event.