Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/egusphere-2024-1144
https://doi.org/10.5194/egusphere-2024-1144
23 Apr 2024
 | 23 Apr 2024
Status: this preprint is open for discussion and under review for Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics (ACP).

Spatial and temporal variation in long-term temperature and water vapor in the mesopause Region

Chaman Gul, Shichang Kang, Yuanjian Yang, Xinlei Ge, and Dong Guo

Abstract. Mesopause is the zone of minimum temperature in Earth’s atmosphere. Temperature variation in this region is one of the important responsible factors for chemical and physical changes including spatiotemporal variability in water vapor content. Twenty-two years of monthly temperature and water vapor data were used from Sounding of the Atmosphere using Broadband Emission Radiometry. Eight months per year (excluding transitional months) were selected for temporal analysis. Spatially the region is classified into four parts including Northern, and Southern Poles. Long-term variations in water vapor and temperature in the selected domains of time and space as well as at equinoxes and solstices are presented. A decreasing, and increasing trend in temperature and water vapor respectively was observed during the study period. Yearly averaged temperature and water vapor content showed that 2002 was the hottest year (193 K) and had minimum water vaper content (0.89 ppmv) and 2018 was the coldest year (187 K) and had maximum water vapor content (1.14 ppmv). June and July were the coldest months and January and December were hotter months throughout the year over the North Pole and Equator. The vertical gradient of temperature and water vapor (80 to 100 km) changes with space and time however, has a strong negative relation in all selected locations and seasons. Around the equinoxes, the monthly average distribution of mesopause temperature was highest (191 K), followed by winter solstice and then summer solstice. The decreasing trend in temperature and an increasing trend in water vapor can be an early warning indication for future climate change.

Publisher's note: Copernicus Publications remains neutral with regard to jurisdictional claims made in the text, published maps, institutional affiliations, or any other geographical representation in this preprint. The responsibility to include appropriate place names lies with the authors.
Chaman Gul, Shichang Kang, Yuanjian Yang, Xinlei Ge, and Dong Guo

Status: open (until 04 Jun 2024)

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse
  • RC1: 'Comment on egusphere-2024-1144', Anonymous Referee #1, 06 May 2024 reply
  • RC2: 'Comment on egusphere-2024-1144', Anonymous Referee #2, 09 May 2024 reply
  • RC3: 'Comment on egusphere-2024-1144', Anonymous Referee #3, 16 May 2024 reply
Chaman Gul, Shichang Kang, Yuanjian Yang, Xinlei Ge, and Dong Guo
Chaman Gul, Shichang Kang, Yuanjian Yang, Xinlei Ge, and Dong Guo

Viewed

Total article views: 312 (including HTML, PDF, and XML)
HTML PDF XML Total BibTeX EndNote
245 52 15 312 5 6
  • HTML: 245
  • PDF: 52
  • XML: 15
  • Total: 312
  • BibTeX: 5
  • EndNote: 6
Views and downloads (calculated since 23 Apr 2024)
Cumulative views and downloads (calculated since 23 Apr 2024)

Viewed (geographical distribution)

Total article views: 326 (including HTML, PDF, and XML) Thereof 326 with geography defined and 0 with unknown origin.
Country # Views %
  • 1
1
 
 
 
 
Latest update: 20 May 2024
Download
Short summary
Long-term variations in upper atmospheric temperature and water vapor in the selected domains of time and space are presented. The temperature during the past two decades showed a cooling trend and water vapor showed an increasing trend and had an inverse relation with temperature in selected domains of space and time. Seasonal temperature variations are distinct, with a summer minimum and a winter maximum. Our results can be an early warning indication for future climate change.