Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/egusphere-2023-2709
https://doi.org/10.5194/egusphere-2023-2709
08 Feb 2024
 | 08 Feb 2024

Towards a sector-specific CO/CO2 emission ratio: Satellite-based observation of CO release from steel production in Germany

Oliver Schneising, Michael Buchwitz, Maximilian Reuter, Michael Weimer, Heinrich Bovensmann, John P. Burrows, and Hartmut Bösch

Abstract. Global crude steel production is expected to continue to increase in the coming decades to meet the demands of the growing world population. Currently, the dominant steelmaking technology worldwide is the conventional highly CO2-intensive Blast Furnace – Basic Oxygen Furnace production route (also known as the Linz-Donawitz process) using iron ore as raw material and coke as a reducing agent. As a result, large quantities of special gases that are rich in carbon monoxide (CO) are by-products of the various stages of the steelmaking process. Given the challenges associated with satellite-based estimates of carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions at the scale of emitting installations due to significant background levels, co-emitted CO may serve as a valuable indicator of the carbon footprint of steel plants.

We show that regional CO release from steel production sites can be monitored from space using 5 years of measurements (2018–2022) from the TROPOspheric monitoring instrument (TROPOMI) on board the Sentinel-5 Precursor satellite benefiting from its relatively high spatial resolution and daily global coverage. We analyse all German steel plants with blast furnaces and basic oxygen furnaces and obtain associated CO emissions in the range of 50–400 kt yr-1 per site. A comparison with the respective CO2 emissions on the level of emitting installations available from emissions trading data of the European Union Emissions Trading System yields a linear relationship with a sector-specific CO/CO2 emission ratio for the analysed steelworks of 3.24 % [2.73–3.89; 1σ] suggesting the feasibility of using CO as a proxy for CO2 emissions from comparable steel production sites.

Publisher's note: Copernicus Publications remains neutral with regard to jurisdictional claims made in the text, published maps, institutional affiliations, or any other geographical representation in this preprint. The responsibility to include appropriate place names lies with the authors.
Oliver Schneising, Michael Buchwitz, Maximilian Reuter, Michael Weimer, Heinrich Bovensmann, John P. Burrows, and Hartmut Bösch

Status: closed

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse
  • RC1: 'Comment on egusphere-2023-2709', Anonymous Referee #1, 29 Feb 2024
  • RC2: 'Comment on egusphere-2023-2709', Anonymous Referee #2, 21 Mar 2024
  • AC1: 'Final response to referee comments', Oliver Schneising, 30 Apr 2024

Status: closed

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse
  • RC1: 'Comment on egusphere-2023-2709', Anonymous Referee #1, 29 Feb 2024
  • RC2: 'Comment on egusphere-2023-2709', Anonymous Referee #2, 21 Mar 2024
  • AC1: 'Final response to referee comments', Oliver Schneising, 30 Apr 2024
Oliver Schneising, Michael Buchwitz, Maximilian Reuter, Michael Weimer, Heinrich Bovensmann, John P. Burrows, and Hartmut Bösch

Data sets

TROPOMI/WFMD XCH4 and XCO v1.8 O. Schneising https://www.iup.uni-bremen.de/carbon_ghg/products/tropomi_wfmd/

Oliver Schneising, Michael Buchwitz, Maximilian Reuter, Michael Weimer, Heinrich Bovensmann, John P. Burrows, and Hartmut Bösch

Viewed

Total article views: 578 (including HTML, PDF, and XML)
HTML PDF XML Total BibTeX EndNote
433 125 20 578 12 10
  • HTML: 433
  • PDF: 125
  • XML: 20
  • Total: 578
  • BibTeX: 12
  • EndNote: 10
Views and downloads (calculated since 08 Feb 2024)
Cumulative views and downloads (calculated since 08 Feb 2024)

Viewed (geographical distribution)

Total article views: 587 (including HTML, PDF, and XML) Thereof 587 with geography defined and 0 with unknown origin.
Country # Views %
  • 1
1
 
 
 
 
Latest update: 12 Jun 2024
Download
Short summary
Large quantities of CO and CO2 are emitted during conventional steel production. As satellite-based estimates of CO2 emissions at facility level are challenging, co-emitted CO can indicate the carbon footprint of steel plants. We estimate CO emissions for German steelworks and use CO2 emissions from emissions trading data to derive a sector-specific CO/CO2 emission ratio for the steel industry, which is a prerequisite to use CO as a proxy for CO2 emissions from comparable steel production sites.