Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/egusphere-2023-2940
https://doi.org/10.5194/egusphere-2023-2940
11 Dec 2023
 | 11 Dec 2023

The correlation between Arctic sea ice, cloud phase and radiation using A-train satellites

Grégory V. Cesana, Olivia Pierpaoli, Matteo Ottaviani, Linh Vu, and Zhonghai Jin

Abstract. Climate warming has a stronger impact on Arctic climate and sea ice cover (SIC) decline than previously thought. Better understanding and characterizing the relationship between sea ice, clouds and the implications for surface radiation is key to improving our confidence in Arctic climate projections. Here we analyze the relationship between sea ice, cloud phase and surface radiation over the Arctic, defined as north of 60° N, using active- and passive-sensor satellite observations from three different datasets. We find that all datasets agree on the climatology and seasonal variability of total and liquid-bearing (liquid and mixed-phase) cloud covers. Similarly, our results show a robust relationship between decreased SIC and increased liquid-bearing clouds in the lowest levels (below 3 km) for all seasons but summer, while increased SIC and ice clouds are positively correlated in two of the three datasets. A refined spatial correlation analysis indicates that the relationship between SIC and liquid-bearing clouds can change sign over the Bering, Barent and Laptev seas, likely because of intrusions of warm air from low latitudes during winter and spring. Finally, the increase of liquid clouds resulting from decreasing SIC is associated with enhanced radiative cooling at the surface, which should contribute to dampening future Arctic surface warming as SIC continues to decline.

Grégory V. Cesana, Olivia Pierpaoli, Matteo Ottaviani, Linh Vu, and Zhonghai Jin

Status: final response (author comments only)

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse
  • RC1: 'Comment on egusphere-2023-2940', Anonymous Referee #1, 05 Feb 2024
  • CC1: 'Comment on egusphere-2023-2940', Luca Lelli, 08 Feb 2024
  • RC2: 'Comment on egusphere-2023-2940', Anonymous Referee #2, 13 Feb 2024
Grégory V. Cesana, Olivia Pierpaoli, Matteo Ottaviani, Linh Vu, and Zhonghai Jin
Grégory V. Cesana, Olivia Pierpaoli, Matteo Ottaviani, Linh Vu, and Zhonghai Jin

Viewed

Total article views: 419 (including HTML, PDF, and XML)
HTML PDF XML Total Supplement BibTeX EndNote
328 73 18 419 25 8 9
  • HTML: 328
  • PDF: 73
  • XML: 18
  • Total: 419
  • Supplement: 25
  • BibTeX: 8
  • EndNote: 9
Views and downloads (calculated since 11 Dec 2023)
Cumulative views and downloads (calculated since 11 Dec 2023)

Viewed (geographical distribution)

Total article views: 419 (including HTML, PDF, and XML) Thereof 419 with geography defined and 0 with unknown origin.
Country # Views %
  • 1
1
 
 
 
 
Latest update: 29 Feb 2024
Download
Short summary
Better characterizing the relationship between sea ice and clouds is key to understanding Arctic climate, because clouds and sea ice affect surface radiation and modulate Arctic surface warming. Our results indicate that Arctic liquid clouds robustly increase in response to sea-ice decrease. This increase has a cooling effect on the surface, because more solar radiation is reflected back to space, and it should contribute to dampening future Arctic surface warming.