Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/egusphere-2023-2605
https://doi.org/10.5194/egusphere-2023-2605
21 Dec 2023
 | 21 Dec 2023
Status: this preprint is open for discussion.

Toward Long-Term Monitoring of Regional Permafrost Thaw with Satellite InSAR

Taha Sadeghi Chorsi, Franz J. Meyer, and Timothy H. Dixon

Abstract. We estimate active layer thickness (ALT) for part of northern Alaska’s permafrost zone for summer 2017 to 2022 using satellite data from Sentinel-1 and ICESat-2. Interferograms were inverted using a Short Baseline Subset (SBAS) approach to estimate the amplitude of seasonal subsidence. ALT was estimated from the measured subsidence. ICESat-2 products were used to validate the InSAR displacement time-series. Most subsidence occurs between June and August in our study area. The maximum amplitude of seasonal subsidence was 2–6 cm, with ALT exceeding 1.5 m. Estimated ALT is in good agreement with in-situ and other remotely sensed data, but is sensitive to assumed thaw season onset, indicating the need for reliable surface temperature data. Our results suggest the feasibility of long-term permafrost monitoring with satellite InSAR.

Taha Sadeghi Chorsi, Franz J. Meyer, and Timothy H. Dixon

Status: open (until 23 Mar 2024)

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Taha Sadeghi Chorsi, Franz J. Meyer, and Timothy H. Dixon
Taha Sadeghi Chorsi, Franz J. Meyer, and Timothy H. Dixon

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Short summary
Active layer, the soil or sediment layer above permafrost, thaws and freezes seasonally. The annual freeze-thaw cycle of the active layer causes significant surface height change. We estimate subsidence rate and active layer thickness (ALT) for part of northern Alaska’s permafrost zone for summer 2017 to 2022 using satellite radar interferometry and LiDAR. ALT estimates range from ~20 cm to larger than 150 cm. Subsidence rate varies ranging from ~3–20 cm/year during the thaw season.