Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/egusphere-2022-963
https://doi.org/10.5194/egusphere-2022-963
 
04 Nov 2022
04 Nov 2022
Status: this preprint is open for discussion.

Quantification of the effects of long-term straw return on soil organic matter spatiotemporal variation: A case study in typical black soil region

Yang Yan1, Wenjun Ji1,2, Baoguo Li1,2, Guiman Wang3, Songchao Chen4,5, Dehai Zhu1,2, and Zhong Liu1 Yang Yan et al.
  • 1College of land Science and Technology, China Agricultural University, Beijing, 100193, China
  • 2Key Laboratory of Agricultural Land Quality, Ministry of Natural Resources, Beijing, 100193, China
  • 3Lishu Metrological Bureau, Lishu, Jilin 158100, China
  • 4InfoSol, INRAE, US 1106, Orléans F-4075, France
  • 5ZJU-Hangzhou Global Scientific and Technological Innovation Center, Hangzhou 311200, China

Abstract. The straw return practice is essential to soil organic matter (SOM) accumulation in the black soil area with high carbon sequestration potential. However, due to lacking accurate spatial distribution of straw return, few studies took straw return as a variable to carry out rigorous research on the impact of straw return on SOM variation on a regional scale. Based on soil samples and 16 environmental covariates including a 10-meter-resolution straw return amount, the study mapped the spatial distributions of SOM in 2006 and 2018 by random forest (RF) and evaluated the effects of the interaction of soil properties, land use and straw return on SOM spatial-temporal variation. The results show that in the context of the straw returning, the mean SOM content increased from 18.93 g kg−1 to 20.84 g kg−1 during 2006–2018. And 74.49 % of the region had a significant increase (maximum: 24.41 g kg−1) of SOM. The severest SOM loss occurred in the northwest due to the light texture and the transition from paddy fields to dryland. Nevertheless, for areas from paddy fields to dryland, the SOM loss decreased with the increased amount of straw return. The SOM even increased by 1.84 g kg−1 when the straw return amount reached 60–100 %. In addition, soil with higher initial SOM and sand content had a lower response to straw return. The study revealed that straw return is beneficial to carbon sink in farmland and is a better way to prevent a carbon source caused by the change of paddy field to dryland.

Yang Yan et al.

Status: open (until 01 Jan 2023)

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse
  • CC1: 'Comment on egusphere-2022-963', Shuo Li, 05 Dec 2022 reply

Yang Yan et al.

Yang Yan et al.

Viewed

Total article views: 338 (including HTML, PDF, and XML)
HTML PDF XML Total BibTeX EndNote
235 93 10 338 4 7
  • HTML: 235
  • PDF: 93
  • XML: 10
  • Total: 338
  • BibTeX: 4
  • EndNote: 7
Views and downloads (calculated since 04 Nov 2022)
Cumulative views and downloads (calculated since 04 Nov 2022)

Viewed (geographical distribution)

Total article views: 333 (including HTML, PDF, and XML) Thereof 333 with geography defined and 0 with unknown origin.
Country # Views %
  • 1
1
 
 
 
 
Latest update: 06 Dec 2022
Download
Short summary
The response rate of SOM to the amount of straw return was inversely proportional to the initial SOM and the sand contents. From paddy to dry land, the SOM loss decreased with the increased amount of straw return. The SOM even increased by 1.84 g kg−1 when the straw return amount reached 60–100 %. The study revealed that straw return is beneficial to carbon sink in farmland and is a way to prevent a C source caused by the change of paddy field to upland.