Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/egusphere-2022-351
https://doi.org/10.5194/egusphere-2022-351
 
24 May 2022
24 May 2022
Status: this preprint is open for discussion and under review for Weather and Climate Dynamics (WCD).

The composite development and structure of intense synoptic-scale Arctic cyclones

Alexander F. Vessey1, Kevin I. Hodges1,2, Len C. Shaffrey1,2, and Jonathan J. Day3 Alexander F. Vessey et al.
  • 1Department of Meteorology, University of Reading, Earley Gate, Reading RG6 6BB, UK
  • 2National Centre for Atmospheric Science, University of Reading, Earley Gate, Reading RG6 6BB, UK
  • 3ECMWF, Shinfeld Park, Reading RG2 9AX, UK

Abstract. Understanding the location and intensity of hazardous weather across the Arctic is important for assessing risks to infrastructure, shipping, and coastal communities. A key driver of these risks are the high winds, high ocean waves and heavy precipitation, which are dependent on the structure and development of intense synoptic-scale cyclones. This study aims to describe the typical lifetime, structure, and development of a large sample of past intense winter (DJF) and summer (JJA) synoptic-scale Arctic cyclones, using a storm compositing methodology applied to the ERA5 reanalysis.

Results show that the composite development and structure of intense Arctic summer cyclones is different to that of intense winter Arctic and North Atlantic Ocean extra-tropical cyclones, and to that described in conceptual models of extra-tropical and Arctic cyclones. The composite structure of intense Arctic summer cyclones shows that they typically undergo a structural transition around the time of maximum intensity from having a baroclinic structure to an axi-symmetric cold-core structure throughout the troposphere, with a low-lying tropopause and large positive temperature anomaly in the lower stratosphere. Arctic summer cyclones are also found to have longer lifetimes than these other cyclones, potentially causing prolonged hazardous and disruptive weather conditions in the Arctic.

Alexander F. Vessey et al.

Status: open (until 10 Jul 2022)

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse
  • RC1: 'Comment on egusphere-2022-351', Anonymous Referee #1, 11 Jun 2022 reply
  • RC2: 'Comment on egusphere-2022-351', Anonymous Referee #2, 19 Jun 2022 reply
  • RC3: 'Comment on egusphere-2022-351', Anonymous Referee #3, 30 Jun 2022 reply

Alexander F. Vessey et al.

Alexander F. Vessey et al.

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Short summary
Understanding the location and intensity of hazardous weather across the Arctic is important for assessing risks to infrastructure, shipping, and coastal communities. This study describes the typical lifetime and structure of intense winter and summer Arctic cyclones. Results show the composite development and structure of intense Arctic summer cyclones is different to intense winter Arctic and North Atlantic Ocean extra-tropical cyclones, and to conceptual models.