Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/egusphere-2022-1419
https://doi.org/10.5194/egusphere-2022-1419
 
16 Dec 2022
16 Dec 2022
Status: this preprint is open for discussion.

Multi-phase Biogeochemical Model for Microbially Induced Desaturation and Precipitation

Caitlyn A. Hall1,2, Andre van Turnhout3,4, Leon van Paassen5, Edward Kavazanjian6,7, and Bruce Rittmann8 Caitlyn A. Hall et al.
  • 1The Honors College and Biosystems Engineering Department, The University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, USA
  • 2Biosystems Engineering Department, The University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, USA
  • 3VALCON, Utrecht, The Netherlands
  • 4Delft University of Technology, Delft, The Netherlands
  • 5Center for Bio-mediated and Bio-inspired Geotechnics, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ, USA
  • 6Royal Boskalis Westminster N.V., Papendrecht, The Netherlands, USA
  • 7Center for Bio-mediated and Bio-inspired Geotechnics, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ, USA
  • 8Biodesign Swette Center for Environmental Biotechnology, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ, USA

Abstract. A next-generation biogeochemical model was developed to explore the impact of the native water source on microbially induced desaturation and precipitation (MIDP) via denitrification. MIDP is a non-disruptive, nature-based ground improvement technique that offers the promise of cost-effective mitigation of earthquake-induced soil liquefaction under and adjacent to existing structures. MIDP leverages native soil bacteria to reduce the potential for liquefaction triggering in the short term through biogenic gas generation (treatment completed within hours to days) and over a longer term through calcium carbonate precipitation (treatment completed in weeks to months). This next-generation biogeochemical model expands earlier modeling to consider multi-phase speciation, bacterial competition, inhibition, and precipitation. This biogeochemical model was used to explore the impact of varying treatment recipes on MIDP products and by-products in a natural seawater environment. The case study presented herein demonstrates the importance of optimizing treatment recipes to minimize unwanted by-products (e.g., H2S production) or incomplete denitrification (e.g., nitrate and nitrite accumulation).

Caitlyn A. Hall et al.

Status: open (until 09 Feb 2023)

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  • RC1: 'Comment on egusphere-2022-1419', Albert Valocchi, 02 Feb 2023 reply

Caitlyn A. Hall et al.

Model code and software

Multi-phase Biogeochemical Model for Microbially Induced Desaturation and Precipitation Caitlyn A Hall, Andre van Turnhout, Leon van Paassen, Edward Kavazanjian, Bruce Rittmann https://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.7410676

Caitlyn A. Hall et al.

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Short summary
Earthquake-induced soil liquefaction poses a significant global threat. Microbially Induced Desaturation and Precipitation (MIDP) via denitrification is a potentially sustainable, non-disruptive bacteria-driven ground improvement technique under existing structures. We developed a next-generation biogeochemical model to understand and predict the behavior of MIDP in the natural environment to design field-based hazard mitigation treatments.