Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/egusphere-2024-921
https://doi.org/10.5194/egusphere-2024-921
03 May 2024
 | 03 May 2024
Status: this preprint is open for discussion and under review for Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics (ACP).

Characterization of AOD anomalies in September and October 2022 over Skukuza in South Africa

Marion Ranaivombola, Nelson Bègue, Farahnaz Fazel-Rastgar, Venkataraman Sivakumar, Gisèle Krysztofiak, Gwenaël Berthet, Fabrice Jegou, Stuart Piketh, and Hassan Bencherif

Abstract. This case study presents the evolution of aerosol optical properties during Intensive Observational Period (IOP) of the Biomass Burning Aerosol Campaign (BiBAC) in the Kruger National Park at Skukuza, between 18 and 23 September (Event 1) and 9 and 17 October (Event 2) 2022. The aerosol classification from sun-photometer data is consistent with the CALIOP, showing a predominance of biomass burning aerosols. The transport of CO and aerosols shows a southeastward transport over Southern Africa and toward the SWIO basin. The vertical distribution of aerosols spans vertically from the surface to 6 km (Event 1) and until 10 km (Event 2). The study discusses the synoptic conditions that have favored the significant perturbation of aerosol loading from September to October 2022. During Event 1, the "river of smoke" phenomenon was driven by surface ridge tongues with the westerly wave not being converted into a COL. During Event 2, a surface heat low, mid-tropospheric anti-cyclonic system, and warm air column resulted in stable conditions, which was also influenced by strong subsidence. The study investigates the long-range transport of biomass burning from South America to Southern Africa, with the plume exiting over southern Brazil, likely driven by the Southern American low-level jet (SALLJ), which is driven by climate forcings like El Niño–Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO). Further research addresses to the contribution of biomass burning plumes from Southern Africa and South America to those observed during both events and determines the atmospheric pattern.

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Marion Ranaivombola, Nelson Bègue, Farahnaz Fazel-Rastgar, Venkataraman Sivakumar, Gisèle Krysztofiak, Gwenaël Berthet, Fabrice Jegou, Stuart Piketh, and Hassan Bencherif

Status: open (until 14 Jun 2024)

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Marion Ranaivombola, Nelson Bègue, Farahnaz Fazel-Rastgar, Venkataraman Sivakumar, Gisèle Krysztofiak, Gwenaël Berthet, Fabrice Jegou, Stuart Piketh, and Hassan Bencherif

Video supplement

Aerosol Optical Depth at 550 from CAMS Reanalysis (September 18 to 23, 2022) Marion Ranaivombola https://doi.org/10.5446/67052

Aerosol Optical Depth at 550 from CAMS Reanalysis (October 9 to 17, 2022) Marion Ranaivombola https://doi.org/10.5446/67051

Marion Ranaivombola, Nelson Bègue, Farahnaz Fazel-Rastgar, Venkataraman Sivakumar, Gisèle Krysztofiak, Gwenaël Berthet, Fabrice Jegou, Stuart Piketh, and Hassan Bencherif

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Short summary
From September to October 2022, the Biomass Burning Aerosol Campaign (BiBAC) in Kruger National Park revealed a significant aerosol loading linked to biomass burning activity, with a southeastward transport over Southern Africa and the southwestern of Indian Ocean (SWIO) basin. The "river of smoke" phenomenon drove the plume during September toward the SWIO. One discusses the long-range transport of biomass burning from South America to Southern Africa is likely driven by climate forcings.