Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/egusphere-2024-804
https://doi.org/10.5194/egusphere-2024-804
11 Apr 2024
 | 11 Apr 2024
Status: this preprint is open for discussion.

Measurement of greenhouse gas fluxes in agricultural soils with a flexible, open-design automated system

Samuel Franco-Luesma, María Alonso-Ayuso, Benjamin Wolf, Borja Latorre, and Jorge Álvaro-Fuentes

Abstract. Over the last decades and due to the current climate change situation, the study of the impacts of human activities on climate has reached great importance, being agriculture one of the main sources of soil greenhouse gas. There are different techniques to quantify the soil gas fluxes, such as micrometeorological techniques or chamber techniques, being the last one capable to assess different treatment at the same site. Manual chambers are the most common one. However, due to the low sampling frequency, this approach cannot resolve short-term emission events, like fertilization or rewetting. For this reason, automated chamber systems are an opportunity to improve soil gas flux determination, but their distribution is still scarce due to the cost and challenging technical implementation. The objective of this study was to develop an automated chamber system for agricultural systems under Mediterranean conditions and compare measured GHG flux rates to those derived using manual chambers. A comparison between manual and automated chamber systems was conducted to evaluate the soil gas fluxes obtained by the automated system. Moreover, over a period of one month the soil gas fluxes were determined by both systems to compare their capabilities to capture the temporal variability of soil gas emissions. The automated system reported higher soil GHG fluxes compared to the manual chamber system. Additionally, the higher sampling frequency of the automated chamber system allowed for the capture of daily flux variations, resulting in a more accurate estimation of cumulative soil gas emissions. The study emphasises the importance of chamber dimension and shape, as well as sampling frequency, in the development of chamber systems, especially when using the manual chamber system.

Publisher's note: Copernicus Publications remains neutral with regard to jurisdictional claims made in the text, published maps, institutional affiliations, or any other geographical representation in this preprint. The responsibility to include appropriate place names lies with the authors.
Samuel Franco-Luesma, María Alonso-Ayuso, Benjamin Wolf, Borja Latorre, and Jorge Álvaro-Fuentes

Status: open (until 23 May 2024)

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse
Samuel Franco-Luesma, María Alonso-Ayuso, Benjamin Wolf, Borja Latorre, and Jorge Álvaro-Fuentes
Samuel Franco-Luesma, María Alonso-Ayuso, Benjamin Wolf, Borja Latorre, and Jorge Álvaro-Fuentes

Viewed

Total article views: 189 (including HTML, PDF, and XML)
HTML PDF XML Total Supplement BibTeX EndNote
147 32 10 189 17 5 5
  • HTML: 147
  • PDF: 32
  • XML: 10
  • Total: 189
  • Supplement: 17
  • BibTeX: 5
  • EndNote: 5
Views and downloads (calculated since 11 Apr 2024)
Cumulative views and downloads (calculated since 11 Apr 2024)

Viewed (geographical distribution)

Total article views: 188 (including HTML, PDF, and XML) Thereof 188 with geography defined and 0 with unknown origin.
Country # Views %
  • 1
1
 
 
 
 
Latest update: 19 May 2024
Download
Short summary
Agriculture may have a significant role on the climate change mitigation. For that reason, it is necessary to have good estimation of the greenhouse gases (GHG) emissions from the agricultural activities. In this work, two different chamber systems to determine GHG were compared. Our results highlighted that automated chamber systems, compared to manual chamber systems, are a powerful tool for quantifying GHG fluxes, allowing to capture the large temporal variability that characterizes them.