Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/egusphere-2024-570
https://doi.org/10.5194/egusphere-2024-570
07 Mar 2024
 | 07 Mar 2024

Quantifying the diurnal variation of atmospheric NO2 from observations of the Geostationary Environment Monitoring Spectrometer (GEMS)

David P. Edwards, Sara Martínez-Alonso, Duseong S. Jo, Ivan Ortega, Louisa K. Emmons, John J. Orlando, Helen M. Worden, Jhoon Kim, Hanlim Lee, Junsung Park, and Hyunkee Hong

Abstract. The Geostationary Environment Monitoring Spectrometer (GEMS) over Asia is the first geostationary Earth orbit instrument in the virtual constellation of sensors for atmospheric chemistry and composition air quality research and applications. For the first time, the hourly observations enable studies of diurnal variation of several important trace gas and aerosol pollutants including nitrogen dioxide (NO2) which is the focus of this work. NO2 is a regulated pollutant and an indicator of anthropogenic emissions in addition to being involved in tropospheric ozone chemistry and particulate matter formation. We present new quantitative measures of NO2 tropospheric column diurnal variation which can be greater than 50 % of the column amount especially in polluted environments. The NO2 distribution is seen to change hourly and can be quite different from what would be seen by a once-a-day low Earth orbit satellite observation. We use GEMS data in combination with TROPOMI satellite and Pandora ground-based remote sensing measurements and MUSICAv0 3D chemical transport model analysis to examine the NO2 diurnal variation in January and June 2023 over Northeast Asia and Seoul, South Korea, study regions to distinguish the different emissions, chemistry, and meteorological processes that drive the variation. Understanding the relative importance of these processes will be important for including pollutant diurnal variation in models aimed at determining true pollutant exposure levels for air quality studies. The work presented here also provides a path for investigating similar NO2 diurnal cycles in the new TEMPO data over North America, and later over Europe with S-4.

David P. Edwards, Sara Martínez-Alonso, Duseong S. Jo, Ivan Ortega, Louisa K. Emmons, John J. Orlando, Helen M. Worden, Jhoon Kim, Hanlim Lee, Junsung Park, and Hyunkee Hong

Status: final response (author comments only)

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse
  • RC1: 'Comment on egusphere-2024-570', Anonymous Referee #1, 25 Mar 2024
  • RC2: 'Comment on egusphere-2024-570', Anonymous Referee #2, 07 Apr 2024
David P. Edwards, Sara Martínez-Alonso, Duseong S. Jo, Ivan Ortega, Louisa K. Emmons, John J. Orlando, Helen M. Worden, Jhoon Kim, Hanlim Lee, Junsung Park, and Hyunkee Hong
David P. Edwards, Sara Martínez-Alonso, Duseong S. Jo, Ivan Ortega, Louisa K. Emmons, John J. Orlando, Helen M. Worden, Jhoon Kim, Hanlim Lee, Junsung Park, and Hyunkee Hong

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Short summary
Until recently, satellite observations of atmospheric pollutants at any location could only be obtained once-a-day at best. New geostationary satellites stare at a region of the Earth to make hourly measurements, and GEMS is the first looking at Asia. We use GEMS data and atmospheric computer simulations to show how the large change seen during the day for one important pollutant that determines air quality depends on a combination of pollution emissions, atmospheric chemistry, and meteorology.