Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/egusphere-2024-509
https://doi.org/10.5194/egusphere-2024-509
14 Mar 2024
 | 14 Mar 2024

Decadal trends in observed surface solar radiation and their causes in Brazil in the first two decades of the 21st century

Lucas Ferreira Correa, Doris Folini, Boriana Chtirkova, and Martin Wild

Abstract. Numerous studies have investigated the long term variability of surface solar radiation (SSR) around the world. However, the large disparity in the availability of observational data between developed and least developed/developing countries leads to an underrepresentation of studies on SSR changes in the latter. This is especially true for South America, where few observational studies have investigated the SSR decadal trends, and usually only at a local or regional scale. In this study we use data from 34 stations distributed throughout all the regions of Brazil to present the decadal SSR decadal trends in the first two decades of the 21st century and investigate their associated causes. The stations were grouped into 8 composites according to their proximity. Our results show that in the North and Northeast Brazil a strong dimming occurred, with significant contributions from increasing atmospheric absorption, most likely due to anthropogenic emissions, and increasing cloud cover. In the Southeast and Midwest regions of Brazil near-zero trends resulted from competing effects of clear-sky processes and strong negative trends in cloud cover. In the South part of the Amazon and in Southern Brazil a statistically insignificant brightening was observed, with significant contribution from decreasing biomass burning emissions in the former and competing minor contributions in the latter. These results can contribute to deepen the knowledge and understanding of SSR decadal trends and their causes in South America, reducing the underrepresentation of this continent when compared to regions like Europe.

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Lucas Ferreira Correa, Doris Folini, Boriana Chtirkova, and Martin Wild

Status: closed

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse
  • RC1: 'Comment on egusphere-2024-509', Anonymous Referee #1, 24 Mar 2024
  • RC2: 'Comment on egusphere-2024-509', Anonymous Referee #2, 03 Apr 2024
  • RC3: 'Comment on egusphere-2024-509', Anonymous Referee #3, 06 Apr 2024
  • AC1: 'Author comment on egusphere-2024-509', Lucas Ferreira Correa, 05 Jun 2024

Status: closed

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse
  • RC1: 'Comment on egusphere-2024-509', Anonymous Referee #1, 24 Mar 2024
  • RC2: 'Comment on egusphere-2024-509', Anonymous Referee #2, 03 Apr 2024
  • RC3: 'Comment on egusphere-2024-509', Anonymous Referee #3, 06 Apr 2024
  • AC1: 'Author comment on egusphere-2024-509', Lucas Ferreira Correa, 05 Jun 2024
Lucas Ferreira Correa, Doris Folini, Boriana Chtirkova, and Martin Wild
Lucas Ferreira Correa, Doris Folini, Boriana Chtirkova, and Martin Wild

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Short summary
We investigated the causes of the decadal trends of solar radiation measured at 34 stations in Brazil in the first two decades of the 21st century. We observed strong negative trends in the north and northeast Brazil, associated both with changes in atmospheric absorption (anthropogenic) and changes in cloud cover (natural). In other parts of the country no strong trends were observed, as a result of competing effects. This provides a better understanding of the energy balance in the region.