Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/egusphere-2024-419
https://doi.org/10.5194/egusphere-2024-419
09 Apr 2024
 | 09 Apr 2024
Status: this preprint is open for discussion.

Comprehensive increase in CO2 release by drying-rewetting cycles among Japanese forests and pastureland soils and exploring predictors of increasing magnitude

Yuri Suzuki, Syuntaro Hiradate, Jun Koarashi, Mariko Atarashi-Andoh, Takumi Yomogida, Yuki Kanda, and Hirohiko Nagano

Abstract. It is still difficult to precisely quantify and predict the effects of drying-rewetting cycles (DWCs) on soil carbon dioxide (CO2) release due to the paucity of studies using constant moisture conditions equivalent to the mean water content during DWC incubation. The present study was performed to evaluate overall trends in the effects of DWCs on CO2 release and to explore environmental and soil predictors for variations in the effect size in 10 Japanese forests and pastureland soils variously affected by volcanic ash during their pedogenesis. Over an 84-day incubation period including three DWCs, CO2 release was 1.3- to 3.7-fold greater than under continuous constant moisture conditions (p < 0.05) with the same mean water content as in the DWC incubations. Analysis of the relations between this increasing magnitude of CO2 release by DWCs (IFCO2) and various environmental and soil properties revealed significant positive correlations between IFCO2 and soil organometal complex contents (p < 0.05), especially pyrophosphate extractable aluminum (Alp) content (r = 0.74). Molar ratios of soil total carbon (C) and pyrophosphate-extractable C (Cp) to Alp contents and soil carbon content-specific CO2 release rate under continuous constant moisture conditions (qCO2_soc) were also correlated with IFCO2 (p < 0.05). The covariations among Alp, total C, and Cp to Alp molar ratios and qCO2_soc suggested Alp as the primary predictor of IFCO2. Whereas soil microbial biomass C and nitrogen (N) levels were significantly lower in DWCs than under continuous constant moisture conditions, there was no significant relation between the microbial biomass decrease and IFCO2. The present study showed a comprehensive increase in soil CO2 release by DWC in Japanese forests and pastureland soils, suggesting that Alp is a predictor of the effect size likely due to vulnerability of organo-Al complexes to DWC.

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Yuri Suzuki, Syuntaro Hiradate, Jun Koarashi, Mariko Atarashi-Andoh, Takumi Yomogida, Yuki Kanda, and Hirohiko Nagano

Status: open (until 10 Jun 2024)

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  • RC1: 'Comment on egusphere-2024-419', Anonymous Referee #1, 11 May 2024 reply
Yuri Suzuki, Syuntaro Hiradate, Jun Koarashi, Mariko Atarashi-Andoh, Takumi Yomogida, Yuki Kanda, and Hirohiko Nagano
Yuri Suzuki, Syuntaro Hiradate, Jun Koarashi, Mariko Atarashi-Andoh, Takumi Yomogida, Yuki Kanda, and Hirohiko Nagano

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Short summary
We incubated 10 Japanese soils to study CO2 release under drying-rewetting cycles (DWCs). CO2 release was increased by DWCs among all soils, showing soil-by-soil variations in CO2 release increase magnitude. Organo-Al complex was the primary predictor for the increase magnitude, suggesting vulnerability of carbon protection by reactive minerals against DWCs. Microbial biomass decrease by DWCs was also suggested, although its linkage with the CO2 release increase is unclear yet.