Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/egusphere-2024-362
https://doi.org/10.5194/egusphere-2024-362
08 Apr 2024
 | 08 Apr 2024
Status: this preprint is open for discussion.

Bridging the gap: a new module for human water use in the Community Earth System Model version 2.2.1

Sabin I. Taranu, David M. Lawrence, Yoshihide Wada, Ting Tang, Erik Kluzek, Sam Rabin, Yi Yao, Steven J. De Hertog, Inne Vanderkelen, and Wim Thiery

Abstract. Water scarcity is often triggered by shifting climate patterns as well as rising water usage, yet state-of-the-art Earth system models typically do not represent human water demand. Here we present an enhancement to the Community Earth System Model (CESM) and its land (CLM) and river (MOSART) components by introducing sectoral water abstractions. The new module enables a better understanding of water demand and supply dynamics across various sectors, including domestic, livestock, thermoelectric, manufacturing, mining, and irrigation. The module conserves water by integrating abstractions from the land component with river component flows, and dynamically calculates daily water scarcity based on local demand and supply. Through land-only simulations spanning 1971–2010, we verify our model against known water scarcity hotspots, historical global water withdrawal trends, and regional variations in water use. Our findings reaffirm the role of irrigation in modulating local surface energy fluxes, while emphasizing the importance of including all sectors for water scarcity assessment capabilities. While the model captures global patterns, it also discerns regional nuances, expanding on the conventional focus on irrigation withdrawals in Earth system models (ESMs). Despite its advancements, the model's limitations, such as its exclusive focus on river water abstractions, highlight areas for potential future refinement. This research paves the way for a more holistic representation of human-water interactions in ESMs, aiming to inform sustainable water management decisions in an evolving global landscape.

Publisher's note: Copernicus Publications remains neutral with regard to jurisdictional claims made in the text, published maps, institutional affiliations, or any other geographical representation in this preprint. The responsibility to include appropriate place names lies with the authors.
Sabin I. Taranu, David M. Lawrence, Yoshihide Wada, Ting Tang, Erik Kluzek, Sam Rabin, Yi Yao, Steven J. De Hertog, Inne Vanderkelen, and Wim Thiery

Status: open (until 03 Jun 2024)

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse
  • RC1: 'Comment on egusphere-2024-362', Anonymous Referee #1, 01 May 2024 reply
  • RC2: 'Comment on egusphere-2024-362', Anonymous Referee #2, 15 May 2024 reply
Sabin I. Taranu, David M. Lawrence, Yoshihide Wada, Ting Tang, Erik Kluzek, Sam Rabin, Yi Yao, Steven J. De Hertog, Inne Vanderkelen, and Wim Thiery
Sabin I. Taranu, David M. Lawrence, Yoshihide Wada, Ting Tang, Erik Kluzek, Sam Rabin, Yi Yao, Steven J. De Hertog, Inne Vanderkelen, and Wim Thiery

Viewed

Total article views: 357 (including HTML, PDF, and XML)
HTML PDF XML Total BibTeX EndNote
267 75 15 357 8 7
  • HTML: 267
  • PDF: 75
  • XML: 15
  • Total: 357
  • BibTeX: 8
  • EndNote: 7
Views and downloads (calculated since 08 Apr 2024)
Cumulative views and downloads (calculated since 08 Apr 2024)

Viewed (geographical distribution)

Total article views: 323 (including HTML, PDF, and XML) Thereof 323 with geography defined and 0 with unknown origin.
Country # Views %
  • 1
1
 
 
 
 
Latest update: 19 May 2024
Download
Short summary
In this study, we improve an existing climate model to account for human water usage across domestic, industrial, and agriculture purposes. With the new capabilities, the model is now better equipped for studying questions related to water scarcity in both present and future conditions under climate change. Despite the advancements, there remains important limitations in our modelling framework which requires further work.