Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/egusphere-2024-1755
https://doi.org/10.5194/egusphere-2024-1755
17 Jun 2024
 | 17 Jun 2024
Status: this preprint is open for discussion.

A multiplexing system for quantifying oxygen fractionation factors in closed chambers

Clémence Paul, Clément Piel, Joana Sauze, Olivier Jossoud, Arnaud Dapoigny, Daniele Romanini, Frédérique Prié, Sébastien Devidal, Roxanne Jacob, Alexandru Milcu, and Amaëlle Landais

Abstract. The study of isotopic ratios of atmospheric oxygen in fossilized air trapped in ice core bubbles provides information on variations in the hydrological cycle at low latitudes and productivity in the past. However, to refine these interpretations, it is necessary to better quantify fractionation of oxygen in the biological processes such as photosynthesis and respiration. We set up a system of closed biological chambers in which we studied the evolution of elemental and isotopic composition of O2 due to biological processes. To easily replicate experiments, we developed a multiplexing system which we describe here. We compared measurements of elemental and isotopic composition of O2 using two different measurement techniques: optical spectrometry (Optical-Feedback Cavity- Enhanced Absorption Spectroscopy, i.e. OF-CEAS technique), which enables higher temporal resolution and continuous data collection and isotopic ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) with a flanged air recovery system, thus validating the data analysis conducted through the OF-CEAS technique. As a first application, we investigated isotopic discrimination during respiration and photosynthesis. We conducted a 5-day experiment using maize (Zea mays L.) as model species. The 18O discrimination value for maize during dark plant respiration was determined as - 17.8 ± 0.9 ‰ by IRMS and - 16.1 ± 1.1 ‰ by optical spectrometer. We also found a value attributed to the isotopic discrimination of terrestrial photosynthesis equal to + 3.2 ± 2.6 ‰ by IRMS and + 6.7 ± 3.8 ‰ by optical spectrometer. These findings were consistent with a previous study by Paul et al. (2023).

Publisher's note: Copernicus Publications remains neutral with regard to jurisdictional claims made in the text, published maps, institutional affiliations, or any other geographical representation in this preprint. The responsibility to include appropriate place names lies with the authors.
Clémence Paul, Clément Piel, Joana Sauze, Olivier Jossoud, Arnaud Dapoigny, Daniele Romanini, Frédérique Prié, Sébastien Devidal, Roxanne Jacob, Alexandru Milcu, and Amaëlle Landais

Status: open (until 22 Aug 2024)

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse
Clémence Paul, Clément Piel, Joana Sauze, Olivier Jossoud, Arnaud Dapoigny, Daniele Romanini, Frédérique Prié, Sébastien Devidal, Roxanne Jacob, Alexandru Milcu, and Amaëlle Landais
Clémence Paul, Clément Piel, Joana Sauze, Olivier Jossoud, Arnaud Dapoigny, Daniele Romanini, Frédérique Prié, Sébastien Devidal, Roxanne Jacob, Alexandru Milcu, and Amaëlle Landais

Viewed

Total article views: 143 (including HTML, PDF, and XML)
HTML PDF XML Total BibTeX EndNote
112 22 9 143 7 5
  • HTML: 112
  • PDF: 22
  • XML: 9
  • Total: 143
  • BibTeX: 7
  • EndNote: 5
Views and downloads (calculated since 17 Jun 2024)
Cumulative views and downloads (calculated since 17 Jun 2024)

Viewed (geographical distribution)

Total article views: 140 (including HTML, PDF, and XML) Thereof 140 with geography defined and 0 with unknown origin.
Country # Views %
  • 1
1
 
 
 
 
Latest update: 24 Jul 2024
Download
Short summary
Our study investigated the influence of plant processes on oxygen dynamics, crucial for paleoclimatology. By examining maize respiration and photosynthesis using advanced techniques, we enhanced our understanding of past climates through ice core analysis.