Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/egusphere-2024-1649
https://doi.org/10.5194/egusphere-2024-1649
10 Jun 2024
 | 10 Jun 2024
Status: this preprint is open for discussion.

Designing and evaluating a public engagement activity about sea level rise

Nieske Vergunst, Tugce Varol, and Erik van Sebille

Abstract. In this paper, we describe the design process of a public engagement activity about sea level rise aimed at young adults aged 16 to 25, intended to enhance participants’ response efficacy and perceived relevance. We conducted the activity at multiple occasions and performed a statistical analysis of the impact measurement among 117 participants. Based on the analysis and observations, we conclude that the activity resonated well with our target audience, regardless of their level of science capital, suggesting that a design study approach is well-suited for the development of similar activities.

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Nieske Vergunst, Tugce Varol, and Erik van Sebille

Status: open (until 05 Aug 2024)

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Nieske Vergunst, Tugce Varol, and Erik van Sebille
Nieske Vergunst, Tugce Varol, and Erik van Sebille

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Short summary
We developed and evaluated a board game about sea level rise to engage young adults. We found that the game positively influenced participants' perceptions of their impact on sea level rise, regardless of their prior familiarity with science. This study suggests that interactive and relatable activities can effectively engage broader audiences on climate issues, highlighting the potential for similar approaches in public science communication.