Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/egusphere-2024-1311
https://doi.org/10.5194/egusphere-2024-1311
14 May 2024
 | 14 May 2024
Status: this preprint is open for discussion.

New ozone-nitrogen model shows early senescence onset is the primary cause of ozone-induced reduction in grain quality of wheat

Jo Cook, Clare Brewster, Felicity Hayes, Nathan Booth, Sam Bland, Pritha Pande, Samarthia Thankappan, Håkan Pleijel, and Lisa Emberson

Abstract. Ozone (O3) air pollution is well known to adversely affect both the grain and protein yield of wheat, an important staple crop. This study aims to identify and model the key plant processes influencing the effect of O3 on wheat protein. We modified the DO3SE-Crop model to incorporate nitrogen (N) processes, and parameterised the O3 effect on stem, leaf and grain N using O3 fumigation datasets spanning 3 years and 4 O3 treatments. Our results show the new model captures the O3 effect on grain N concentrations, and anthesis leaf and stem concentration, well. However, the O3 effect on harvest leaf and stem N is exaggerated. Further, a sensitivity analysis revealed that, irrespective of O3 treatment, accelerated senescence onset was the primary plant process affecting grain N. This modelling study therefore demonstrates the capability of the DO3SE-CropN model to simulate processes by which O3 affects N content, and thereby determines that senescence onset is the main driver of O3 reductions in grain protein yield. The implication of the sensitivity analysis is that breeders should focus their efforts on stay-green cultivars that do not experience a protein penalty when developing O3 tolerant lines, to maintain both wheat yield and nutritional quality under O3 exposure.

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Jo Cook, Clare Brewster, Felicity Hayes, Nathan Booth, Sam Bland, Pritha Pande, Samarthia Thankappan, Håkan Pleijel, and Lisa Emberson

Status: open (until 25 Jun 2024)

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Jo Cook, Clare Brewster, Felicity Hayes, Nathan Booth, Sam Bland, Pritha Pande, Samarthia Thankappan, Håkan Pleijel, and Lisa Emberson
Jo Cook, Clare Brewster, Felicity Hayes, Nathan Booth, Sam Bland, Pritha Pande, Samarthia Thankappan, Håkan Pleijel, and Lisa Emberson

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Short summary
At ground-level, the air pollutant ozone (O3) damages wheat yield and quality. We modified the DO3SE-Crop model to simulate O3 effects on wheat quality and identified onset of leaf death as the key process affecting wheat quality upon O3 exposure. This aligns with expectations as the onset of leaf death aids nutrient transfer from leaves to grains. Breeders should prioritize wheat varieties resistant to protein loss from delayed leaf death, to maintain yield and quality under O3.