Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/egusphere-2024-1163
https://doi.org/10.5194/egusphere-2024-1163
25 Jun 2024
 | 25 Jun 2024
Status: this preprint is open for discussion and under review for Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics (ACP).

Unheralded contributions of biogenic volatile organic compounds from urban greening to ozone pollution: a high-resolution modeling study

Haofan Wang, Yuejin Li, Yiming Liu, Xiao Lu, Yang Zhang, Qi Fan, Tianhang Zhang, and Chong Shen

Abstract. Urban Green Spaces (UGS) are widely advocated for mitigating urban atmospheric environment. However, this study reveals that it can exacerbate urban ozone (O3) levels under certain conditions, as demonstrated by a September 2017 study in Guangzhou, China. Utilizing the Weather Research and Forecasting Model with the Model of Emissions of Gases and Aerosols from Nature (WRF-MEGAN) and the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model with a high horizontal resolution (1 km), we assessed the impact of UGS-related biogenic volatile organic compound (BVOC) emissions on urban O3. Our findings indicate that UGS-BVOC emissions in Guangzhou amounted to 666.49 Gg, primarily from isoprene (ISOP) and terpenes (TERP). These emissions contribute ~30 % of urban ISOP concentrations and their incorporations to the model significantly reduce the underestimation against observations. The study shows improvements in simulation biases for NO2, from 7.01 µg/m3 to 6.03 µg/m3, and for O3, from 7.77 µg/m3 to -1.60 µg/m3. UGS-BVOC and UGS-LUCC (land use cover changes) integration in air quality models notably enhances surface monthly mean O3 predictions by 3.6–8.0 µg/m3 (+3.8–8.5 %) and contributes up to 18.7 µg/m3 (+10.0 %) to MDA8 O3 during O3 pollution episodes. Additionally, UGS-BVOC emissions alone increase the monthly mean O3 levels by 2.2–3.0 µg/m3 (+2.3–3.2 %) in urban areas and contribute up to 6.3 µg/m3 (+3.3 %) to MDA8 O3 levels during O3 pollution episodes. These impacts can extend to surrounding suburban and rural areas through regional transport, highlighting the need for selecting low-emission vegetation and refining vegetation classification in urban planning.

Publisher's note: Copernicus Publications remains neutral with regard to jurisdictional claims made in the text, published maps, institutional affiliations, or any other geographical representation in this preprint. The responsibility to include appropriate place names lies with the authors.
Haofan Wang, Yuejin Li, Yiming Liu, Xiao Lu, Yang Zhang, Qi Fan, Tianhang Zhang, and Chong Shen

Status: open (until 20 Aug 2024)

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse
Haofan Wang, Yuejin Li, Yiming Liu, Xiao Lu, Yang Zhang, Qi Fan, Tianhang Zhang, and Chong Shen
Haofan Wang, Yuejin Li, Yiming Liu, Xiao Lu, Yang Zhang, Qi Fan, Tianhang Zhang, and Chong Shen

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Short summary
This study explores how urban green spaces in Guangzhou influence ozone levels. By using advanced models, we found that natural emissions from these areas can significantly affect air quality. Our results suggest the design and planning of urban green spaces should not only consider aesthetics and social factors but also their environmental impacts on air quality.