Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/egusphere-2024-1087
https://doi.org/10.5194/egusphere-2024-1087
12 Apr 2024
 | 12 Apr 2024
Status: this preprint is open for discussion.

The Cluster spacecraft's view of the motion of the high-latitude magnetopause

Niklas Grimmich, Ferdinand Plaschke, Benjamin Grison, Fabio Prencipe, Christophe Philippe Escoubet, Martin Owain Archer, Ovidiu Dragos Constantinescu, Stein Haaland, Rumi Nakamura, David Gary Sibeck, Fabien Darrouzet, Mykhaylo Hayosh, and Romain Maggiolo

Abstract. The boundary between the interplanetary magnetic field and the terrestrial magnetic field is the magnetopause. This magnetopause is influenced by dynamic changes in the solar wind, that is different solar wind conditions lead to a change in the shape and location of the magnetopause. The interaction between the solar wind and the magnetosphere can be studied from in-situ spacecraft observations. Many studies focus on the equatorial plane, as this is where recent spacecraft constellations such as THEMIS or MMS operate. However, to fully capture the interaction, it is important to study the high latitude regions as well. The Cluster spacecraft allow us to collect a dataset of high-latitude magnetopause crossings and study magnetopause motion in this region, as well as deviations from established magnetopause models. We use multi-spacecraft analysis tools to investigate the direction of magnetopause motion in the high latitudes and compare the occurrence of crossings at different locations with the result in the equatorial plane. We find that the high-latitude magnetopause motion is generally consistent with previously reported values and seems to be more often associated with a closed magnetopause boundary. We show that on average the magnetopause moves faster inwards than outwards. Furthermore, the occurrence of magnetopause positions beyond those predicted by the Shue et al. (1998) model at high latitudes is found to be caused by the similar solar wind parameters as in the equatorial plane. Finally, we highlight the importance of the dipole tilt angle at high latitudes. Our results may be useful for the interpretation of plasma measurements from the upcoming SMILE mission (Branduardi-Raymont et al., 2018), as this spacecraft will also fly frequently through the high-latitude magnetopause.

Publisher's note: Copernicus Publications remains neutral with regard to jurisdictional claims made in the text, published maps, institutional affiliations, or any other geographical representation in this preprint. The responsibility to include appropriate place names lies with the authors.
Niklas Grimmich, Ferdinand Plaschke, Benjamin Grison, Fabio Prencipe, Christophe Philippe Escoubet, Martin Owain Archer, Ovidiu Dragos Constantinescu, Stein Haaland, Rumi Nakamura, David Gary Sibeck, Fabien Darrouzet, Mykhaylo Hayosh, and Romain Maggiolo

Status: open (until 08 Jun 2024)

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse
  • RC1: 'Comment on egusphere-2024-1087', Anonymous Referee #1, 03 May 2024 reply
  • RC2: 'Comment on egusphere-2024-1087', Jonas Suni, 16 May 2024 reply
Niklas Grimmich, Ferdinand Plaschke, Benjamin Grison, Fabio Prencipe, Christophe Philippe Escoubet, Martin Owain Archer, Ovidiu Dragos Constantinescu, Stein Haaland, Rumi Nakamura, David Gary Sibeck, Fabien Darrouzet, Mykhaylo Hayosh, and Romain Maggiolo

Data sets

Database: Cluster Magnetopause Crossings between 2001 and 2020 N. Grimmich et al. https://doi.org/10.17605/OSF.IO/PXCTG

Niklas Grimmich, Ferdinand Plaschke, Benjamin Grison, Fabio Prencipe, Christophe Philippe Escoubet, Martin Owain Archer, Ovidiu Dragos Constantinescu, Stein Haaland, Rumi Nakamura, David Gary Sibeck, Fabien Darrouzet, Mykhaylo Hayosh, and Romain Maggiolo

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Short summary
In our study, we looked at the boundary between the Earth's magnetic field and the interplanetary magnetic field emitted by the Sun, called the magnetopause. While other studies focus on the magnetopause motion near Earth's equator, we have studied it in polar regions. The motion of the magnetopause is faster towards the Earth than towards the Sun. We also found that the occurrence of unusual magnetopause locations is due to similar solar influences in the equatorial and in the polar regions.