Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/egusphere-2024-1073
https://doi.org/10.5194/egusphere-2024-1073
16 Apr 2024
 | 16 Apr 2024
Status: this preprint is open for discussion and under review for Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics (ACP).

Ammonia emission estimates using CrIS satellite observations over Europe

Jieying Ding, Ronald van der A, Henk Eskes, Enrico Dammers, Mark Shephard, Roy Wichink Kruit, Marc Guevara, and Leonor Tarrason

Abstract. Over the past century ammonia (NH3) emissions have increased with the growth of livestock and fertilizer usage. The abundant NH3 emissions lead to secondary fine particulate matter (PM2.5) pollution, climate change, reduction in biodiversity and affects human health. Up-to-date and spatially and temporally resolved information of NH3 emissions is essential to better quantify its impact. In this study we applied the existing DECSO (Daily Emissions Constrained by Satellite Observations) algorithm to NH3 observations from the Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS) to estimate NH3 emissions. Because NH3 in the atmosphere is influenced by Nitrogen Oxides (NOx), we implemented DECSO to estimate NOx and NH3 emissions simultaneously. The emissions are derived over Europe for 2020 on a spatial resolution of 0.2° x 0.2° using daily observations from both CrIS and TROPOMI (on the Sentinel 5p satellite). Due to the sparseness of daily satellite observations of NH3, monthly emissions of NH3 are reported. The total NH3 emissions derived from observations are about 8 Tg/year with a precision of about 0.2 % over the European domain. The comparison of the satellite-derived NH3 emissions from DECSO with independent bottom-up inventories and in-situ observations indicates a consistency in terms of magnitude on the country totals, the results also being comparable regarding the temporal and spatial distributions.

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Jieying Ding, Ronald van der A, Henk Eskes, Enrico Dammers, Mark Shephard, Roy Wichink Kruit, Marc Guevara, and Leonor Tarrason

Status: open (until 14 Jun 2024)

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Jieying Ding, Ronald van der A, Henk Eskes, Enrico Dammers, Mark Shephard, Roy Wichink Kruit, Marc Guevara, and Leonor Tarrason
Jieying Ding, Ronald van der A, Henk Eskes, Enrico Dammers, Mark Shephard, Roy Wichink Kruit, Marc Guevara, and Leonor Tarrason

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Short summary
Here we applied the existing DECSO inversion algorithm to NH3 observations from the CrIS satellite instrument to estimate NH3 emissions. Because NH3 in the atmosphere is influenced by NOx, we implemented DECSO to estimate NOx and NH3 emissions simultaneously. The emissions are derived over Europe for 2020 on a spatial resolution of 0.2° degree using daily observations from both CrIS and TROPOMI. The results are compared to bottom-up emission inventories.