Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/egusphere-2024-1055
https://doi.org/10.5194/egusphere-2024-1055
11 Apr 2024
 | 11 Apr 2024
Status: this preprint is open for discussion.

Expanding seawater carbon dioxide and methane measuring capabilities with a Seaglider

Claudine Hauri, Brita Irving, Dan Hayes, Ehsan Abdi, Jöran Kemme, Nadja Kinski, and Andrew Michael Paul McDonnell

Abstract. Warming, ocean acidification, and deoxygenation are increasingly putting pressure on marine ecosystems. At the same time, thawing permafrost and decomposing hydrates in Arctic shelf seas may release large amounts of methane (CH4) into the water column, which could accelerate local ocean acidification and contribute to climate change. The key parameters to observing and understanding these complex processes and feedback mechanisms are vastly undersampled throughout the oceans. We developed carbon dioxide (CO2) and CH4 gliders, including standard operational procedures with the goal that CO2 and CH4 measurements become more common for glider operations. The Seagliders with integrated Contros HydroC CO2 or CH4 sensors also include conductivity, temperature, depth, oxygen, chlorophyll-a, backscatter, and fluorescent dissolved organic matter sensors. Communication via satellite allows for near-real time data transmission, sensor adjustments, and adaptive sampling. Several sea trials with the CO2 Seaglider in the Gulf of Alaska and data evaluation with discrete water and underway samples suggest near ‘weather quality’ CO2 data as defined by the Global Ocean Acidification Network. A winter mission in Resurrection Bay, Alaska provides first insights into the water column inorganic carbon dynamics during this otherwise undersampled season. The CH4 Seaglider passed its flight trials in Resurrection Bay and is ready to be deployed in an area with greater CH4 activity. Both sensing systems are available to the science community through the industry partners (Advanced Offshore Operations and -4H-JENA) of this project.

Publisher's note: Copernicus Publications remains neutral with regard to jurisdictional claims made in the text, published maps, institutional affiliations, or any other geographical representation in this preprint. The responsibility to include appropriate place names lies with the authors.
Claudine Hauri, Brita Irving, Dan Hayes, Ehsan Abdi, Jöran Kemme, Nadja Kinski, and Andrew Michael Paul McDonnell

Status: open (until 06 Jun 2024)

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse
  • RC1: 'Comment on egusphere-2024-1055', Dariia Atamanchuk, 08 May 2024 reply
  • RC2: 'Comment on egusphere-2024-1055', Damian Leonardo Arévalo-Martínez, 15 May 2024 reply
Claudine Hauri, Brita Irving, Dan Hayes, Ehsan Abdi, Jöran Kemme, Nadja Kinski, and Andrew Michael Paul McDonnell
Claudine Hauri, Brita Irving, Dan Hayes, Ehsan Abdi, Jöran Kemme, Nadja Kinski, and Andrew Michael Paul McDonnell

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Latest update: 19 May 2024
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Short summary
Several sea trials with the newly developed CO2 Seaglider in the Gulf of Alaska and data evaluation with discrete water and underway samples suggest near ‘weather quality’ CO2 data as defined by the Global Ocean Acidification Network.