Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/egusphere-2024-1010
https://doi.org/10.5194/egusphere-2024-1010
15 May 2024
 | 15 May 2024
Status: this preprint is open for discussion and under review for Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics (ACP).

Measurement report: The promotion of low-level jet and thermal-effect on development of deep convective boundary layer at the southern edge of the Taklimakan Desert

Lian Su, Chunsong Lu, Jinlong Yuan, Xiaofei Wang, Qing He, and Haiyun Xia

Abstract. A vigorous development process of the deep convective boundary layer (CBL) was observed at the southern edge of the Taklimakan Desert on 6 June, 2022. Based on coherent Doppler wind lidar and ERA5 data, the formation mechanism of the deep CBL exceeding 5 km was well analyzed, which was mainly promoted by the low-level jet (LLJ) and thermal-effect. The LLJ has made sufficient momentum, energy and material preparations for the development of the deep CBL. Firstly, the cold downhill airflow of the Tibet Plateau leading to LLJ weakens the height and intensity of the temperature inversion layer, which reduces the energy demand for the broken of the IL. Secondly, the LLJ not only supplements the material and energy in the residual layer, but also suppresses the exchange with the lower atmosphere. In addition, the LLJ provides a driving force for the development of the deep CBL. In terms of thermal factors, the Tibet Plateau sensible heat driven air-pump and cold front transit provide additional impetus for the development of the deep CBL. Finally, the formation of deep CBL was catalyzed by the extreme thermal effects of the underlying surface, such as the furnace effect and the atmospheric superadiabatic expansion process. The study of the development of the deep CBL is important for revealing the land-air exchange process of momentum, energy, and material between the Taklimakan Desert and the Tibetan Plateau.

Publisher's note: Copernicus Publications remains neutral with regard to jurisdictional claims made in the text, published maps, institutional affiliations, or any other geographical representation in this preprint. The responsibility to include appropriate place names lies with the authors.
Lian Su, Chunsong Lu, Jinlong Yuan, Xiaofei Wang, Qing He, and Haiyun Xia

Status: open (until 26 Jun 2024)

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Lian Su, Chunsong Lu, Jinlong Yuan, Xiaofei Wang, Qing He, and Haiyun Xia
Lian Su, Chunsong Lu, Jinlong Yuan, Xiaofei Wang, Qing He, and Haiyun Xia

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Short summary
The cold downhill airflow of the Tibet Plateau leading to low-level jet weakens the height and intensity of the inversion layer, which reduces the energy demand for the broken of the inversion layer. The low-level jet causes dust aerosols to accumulate near the ground. The material conditions for the development of the desert atmosphere boundary layer can be quickly transformed into thermal conditions.