Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/egusphere-2024-1003
https://doi.org/10.5194/egusphere-2024-1003
24 May 2024
 | 24 May 2024
Status: this preprint is open for discussion and under review for Climate of the Past (CP).

Shifts in Greenland interannual climate variability lead Dansgaard-Oeschger abrupt warming by hundreds of years

Chloe A. Brashear, Tyler R. Jones, Valerie Morris, Bruce H. Vaughn, William H. G. Roberts, William B. Skorski, Abigail G. Hughes, Richard Nunn, Sune Olander Rasmussen, Kurt M. Cuffey, Bo M. Vinther, Todd Sowers, Christo Buizert, Vasileios Gkinis, Christian Holme, Mari F. Jensen, Sofia E. Kjellman, Petra M. Langebroek, Florian Mekhaldi, Kevin S. Rozmiarek, Jonathan W. Rheinlænder, Margit Simon, Giulia Sinnl, Silje Smith-Johnsen, and James W. C. White

Abstract. During the Last Glacial Period (LGP), Greenland experienced approximately thirty abrupt warming phases, known as Dansgaard-Oeschger (D-O) Events, followed by cooling back to baseline glacial conditions. Studies of mean climate change across warming transitions reveal indistinguishable phase-offsets between shifts in temperature, dust, sea salt, accumulation and moisture source, thus preventing a comprehensive understanding of the “anatomy” of D-O cycles (Capron et al,. 2021). One aspect of abrupt change that has not been systematically assessed is how high-frequency, interannual-scale climatic variability surrounding mean temperature changes across D-O transitions. Here, we utilize the EGRIP ice core high-resolution water isotope record, a proxy for temperature and atmospheric circulation, to quantify the amplitude of 7–15 year isotopic variability for D-O events 2–13, the Younger Dryas and the Bølling-Allerød. On average, cold stadial periods consistently exhibit greater variability than warm interstadial periods. Most notably, we often find that reductions in the amplitude of the 7–15 year band led abrupt D-O warmings by hundreds of years. Such a large phase offset between two climate parameters in a Greenland ice core has never been documented for D-O cycles. However, similar centennial lead times have been found in proxies of Norwegian Sea ice cover relative to abrupt Greenland warming (Sadatzki et al., 2020). Using HadCM3, a fully coupled general circulation model, we assess the effects of sea ice on 7–15 year temperature variability at EGRIP. For a range of stadial and interstadial conditions, we find a strong relationship in line with our observations between colder simulated mean temperature and enhanced temperature variability at the EGRIP location. We also find a robust correlation between year-to-year North Atlantic sea-ice fluctuations and the strength of interannual-scale temperature variability at EGRIP. Thus, both paleoclimate proxy evidence and model simulations suggest that sea ice plays a substantial role in high-frequency climate variability prior to D-O warming. This provides a clue about the anatomy of D-O Events and should be the target of future sea-ice model studies.

Publisher's note: Copernicus Publications remains neutral with regard to jurisdictional claims made in the text, published maps, institutional affiliations, or any other geographical representation in this preprint. The responsibility to include appropriate place names lies with the authors.
Chloe A. Brashear, Tyler R. Jones, Valerie Morris, Bruce H. Vaughn, William H. G. Roberts, William B. Skorski, Abigail G. Hughes, Richard Nunn, Sune Olander Rasmussen, Kurt M. Cuffey, Bo M. Vinther, Todd Sowers, Christo Buizert, Vasileios Gkinis, Christian Holme, Mari F. Jensen, Sofia E. Kjellman, Petra M. Langebroek, Florian Mekhaldi, Kevin S. Rozmiarek, Jonathan W. Rheinlænder, Margit Simon, Giulia Sinnl, Silje Smith-Johnsen, and James W. C. White

Status: open (until 19 Jul 2024)

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse
Chloe A. Brashear, Tyler R. Jones, Valerie Morris, Bruce H. Vaughn, William H. G. Roberts, William B. Skorski, Abigail G. Hughes, Richard Nunn, Sune Olander Rasmussen, Kurt M. Cuffey, Bo M. Vinther, Todd Sowers, Christo Buizert, Vasileios Gkinis, Christian Holme, Mari F. Jensen, Sofia E. Kjellman, Petra M. Langebroek, Florian Mekhaldi, Kevin S. Rozmiarek, Jonathan W. Rheinlænder, Margit Simon, Giulia Sinnl, Silje Smith-Johnsen, and James W. C. White
Chloe A. Brashear, Tyler R. Jones, Valerie Morris, Bruce H. Vaughn, William H. G. Roberts, William B. Skorski, Abigail G. Hughes, Richard Nunn, Sune Olander Rasmussen, Kurt M. Cuffey, Bo M. Vinther, Todd Sowers, Christo Buizert, Vasileios Gkinis, Christian Holme, Mari F. Jensen, Sofia E. Kjellman, Petra M. Langebroek, Florian Mekhaldi, Kevin S. Rozmiarek, Jonathan W. Rheinlænder, Margit Simon, Giulia Sinnl, Silje Smith-Johnsen, and James W. C. White

Viewed

Total article views: 279 (including HTML, PDF, and XML)
HTML PDF XML Total BibTeX EndNote
183 89 7 279 6 8
  • HTML: 183
  • PDF: 89
  • XML: 7
  • Total: 279
  • BibTeX: 6
  • EndNote: 8
Views and downloads (calculated since 24 May 2024)
Cumulative views and downloads (calculated since 24 May 2024)

Viewed (geographical distribution)

Total article views: 278 (including HTML, PDF, and XML) Thereof 278 with geography defined and 0 with unknown origin.
Country # Views %
  • 1
1
 
 
 
 
Latest update: 12 Jun 2024
Download
Short summary
We use a series of spectral techniques to quantify the strength of high-frequency climate variability in Northeastern Greenland to 50,000 ka before present. Importantly, we find that variability consistently decreases hundreds of years prior to Dansgaard-Oeschger warming events. Model simulations suggest a change in North Atlantic sea ice behavior contributed to this pattern, thus providing new information on the conditions which proceeded abrupt climate change during the Last Glacial Period.