Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/egusphere-2024-100
https://doi.org/10.5194/egusphere-2024-100
30 Jan 2024
 | 30 Jan 2024

Possible impact of the 43 BCE Okmok volcanic eruption in Alaska on the climate of China as revealed in historical documents

Pao K. Wang, Elaine Kuan-Hui Lin, Yu-Shiuan Lin, Chung-Rui Lee, Ho-Jiunn Lin, Ching-Wen Chen, and Pi-Ling Pai

Abstract. A massive eruption of Okmok volcano in Alaska has been recently discovered and precisely dated to have occurred in 43 BCE. Some Chinese climate records of 43–33 BCE in historical documents have been found that provide descriptions of observed environmental abnormities that appear to be consistent with the anticipated changes due to volcanic climate forcing. We provide full translation with discussions of the Chinese climate records that may be related to the Okmok eruption in this paper. We have converted ancient Chinese calendar dates to modern Gregorian dates and provided the latitudes and longitudes of the geographical locations mentioned in the records. We believe the detailed information contained in these records will be useful for further research on the climate impact of volcanic eruptions.

Publisher's note: Copernicus Publications remains neutral with regard to jurisdictional claims made in the text, published maps, institutional affiliations, or any other geographical representation in this preprint. The responsibility to include appropriate place names lies with the authors.
Pao K. Wang, Elaine Kuan-Hui Lin, Yu-Shiuan Lin, Chung-Rui Lee, Ho-Jiunn Lin, Ching-Wen Chen, and Pi-Ling Pai

Status: closed

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse
  • RC1: 'Comment on egusphere-2024-100', Chaochao Gao, 18 Feb 2024
    • AC1: 'Reply on RC1', Pao K. Wang, 30 Mar 2024
  • RC2: 'Comment on egusphere-2024-100', Philip Gooding, 19 Feb 2024
    • AC2: 'Reply on RC2', Pao K. Wang, 30 Mar 2024

Status: closed

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse
  • RC1: 'Comment on egusphere-2024-100', Chaochao Gao, 18 Feb 2024
    • AC1: 'Reply on RC1', Pao K. Wang, 30 Mar 2024
  • RC2: 'Comment on egusphere-2024-100', Philip Gooding, 19 Feb 2024
    • AC2: 'Reply on RC2', Pao K. Wang, 30 Mar 2024
Pao K. Wang, Elaine Kuan-Hui Lin, Yu-Shiuan Lin, Chung-Rui Lee, Ho-Jiunn Lin, Ching-Wen Chen, and Pi-Ling Pai
Pao K. Wang, Elaine Kuan-Hui Lin, Yu-Shiuan Lin, Chung-Rui Lee, Ho-Jiunn Lin, Ching-Wen Chen, and Pi-Ling Pai

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Short summary
We provide the detailed translation of some observed abnormal meteorological conditions in 43–33 BCE described in Chinese historical documents that were possibly related to the Okmok volcanic eruption in Alaska in early 43 BCE recently identified. The cold summer record and the abnormal color and low brightness of the sun point to the clear link to the volcanic impact.  The reported duration for the sun to return normal should be useful for researchers modeling the volcanic impact on climate.