Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/egusphere-2023-3132
https://doi.org/10.5194/egusphere-2023-3132
29 Jan 2024
 | 29 Jan 2024
Status: this preprint is open for discussion.

High Resolution Land Surface Modelling over Africa: the role of uncertain soil properties in combination with temporal model resolution

Bamidele Joseph Oloruntoba, Stefan Kollet, Carsten Montzka, Harry Vereecken, and Harrie-Jan Hendricks Franssen

Abstract. Land surface modelling runs with CLM5 over Africa at 3 km resolution were carried out and we assessed the impact of different sources of soil information and different upscaling strategies of the soil information, also in combination with different atmospheric forcings and different temporal resolutions of those atmospheric forcings. FAO and SoilGrids250m were used as soil information. SoilGrids information at 250 m resolution was upscaled to the 3 km grid scale by three different methods: (i) random selection of one of the small SoilGrids250m grid cells contained in the model grid cell; (ii) arithmetic averaging of SoilGrids soil texture values and (iii) selection of the dominant soil texture. These different soil model inputs were combined with different atmospheric forcings model inputs, which provide inputs at different temporal resolutions: CRUNCEPv7 (6-hourly input resolution), GSWPv3 (3-hourly) and WFDE5 (hourly). We found that varying the source of soil texture information (FAO or SoilGrids250m) influences model water balance outputs more than the upscaling methodology of the soil texture maps. However, for high temporal resolution of atmospheric forcings (WFDE5) the different soil texture upscaling methods result in large differences in simulated evapotranspiration, surface runoff and subsurface runoff at the local and regional scales related to the higher resolution representation of rainfall intensity in the model. The upscaling methodology of fine scale soil texture information influences land surface model simulation results, but only clearly in combination with high temporal resolution atmospheric forcings.

Bamidele Joseph Oloruntoba, Stefan Kollet, Carsten Montzka, Harry Vereecken, and Harrie-Jan Hendricks Franssen

Status: open (until 25 Mar 2024)

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  • CC1: 'Comment on egusphere-2023-3132', Zhenyu Zhang, 01 Mar 2024 reply
  • RC1: 'Comment on egusphere-2023-3132', Anonymous Referee #1, 03 Mar 2024 reply
Bamidele Joseph Oloruntoba, Stefan Kollet, Carsten Montzka, Harry Vereecken, and Harrie-Jan Hendricks Franssen
Bamidele Joseph Oloruntoba, Stefan Kollet, Carsten Montzka, Harry Vereecken, and Harrie-Jan Hendricks Franssen

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Short summary
This study uses simulations to understand how the soil information across Africa affects the water balance, using 4 soil databases and 3 different rainfall datasets. Results show that the soil information impacts water balance estimates, especially with a higher rate of rainfall.