Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/egusphere-2023-2953
https://doi.org/10.5194/egusphere-2023-2953
15 Jan 2024
 | 15 Jan 2024

The annual cycle and sources of relevant aerosol precursor vapors in the central Arctic

Matthew Boyer, Diego Aliaga, Lauriane L. J. Quéléver, Silvia Bucci, Hélène Angot, Lubna Dada, Benjamin Heutte, Lisa Beck, Marina Duetsch, Andreas Stohl, Ivo Beck, Tiia Laurila, Nina Sarnela, Roseline C. Thakur, Branka Miljevic, Markku Kulmala, Tuukka Petäjä, Mikko Sipilä, Julia Schmale, and Tuija Jokinen

Abstract. In this study, we present and analyze the first continuous timeseries of relevant aerosol precursor vapors from the central Arctic during the Multidisciplinary drifting Observatory for the Study of Arctic Climate (MOSAiC) expedition. These precursor vapors include sulfuric acid (SA), methanesulfonic acid (MSA), and iodic acid (IA). We use FLEXPART simulations, inverse modeling, sulfur dioxide (SO2) mixing ratios, and chlorophyll-a (chl-a) observations to interpret the 20 seasonal variability of the vapor concentrations and identify dominant sources. Our results show that both natural and anthropogenic sources are relevant for the concentrations of SA in the Arctic, but anthropogenic sources associated with Arctic haze are the most prevalent. MSA concentrations are an order of magnitude higher during polar day than during polar night due to seasonal changes in biological activity. Peak MSA concentrations were observed in May, which corresponds with the timing of the annual peak in chl-a concentrations north of 75° N. IA concentrations exhibit two distinct peaks during 25 the year: a dominant peak in spring and a secondary peak in autumn, suggesting that seasonal IA concentrations depend on both solar radiation and sea ice conditions. In general, the seasonal cycles of SA, MSA, and IA in the central Arctic Ocean are related to sea ice conditions, and we expect that changes in the Arctic environment will affect the concentrations of these vapors in the future. The magnitude of these changes and the subsequent influence on aerosol processes remains uncertain, highlighting the need for continued observations of these precursor vapors in the Arctic.

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Matthew Boyer, Diego Aliaga, Lauriane L. J. Quéléver, Silvia Bucci, Hélène Angot, Lubna Dada, Benjamin Heutte, Lisa Beck, Marina Duetsch, Andreas Stohl, Ivo Beck, Tiia Laurila, Nina Sarnela, Roseline C. Thakur, Branka Miljevic, Markku Kulmala, Tuukka Petäjä, Mikko Sipilä, Julia Schmale, and Tuija Jokinen

Status: final response (author comments only)

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse
  • RC1: 'Comment on egusphere-2023-2953', Anonymous Referee #1, 07 Feb 2024
  • RC2: 'Comment on egusphere-2023-2953', Anonymous Referee #2, 11 Apr 2024
  • RC3: 'Comment on egusphere-2023-2953', Anonymous Referee #3, 15 Apr 2024
  • RC4: 'Comment on egusphere-2023-2953', Anonymous Referee #4, 07 May 2024
  • AC1: 'Comment on egusphere-2023-2953', Matthew Boyer, 15 Jun 2024
Matthew Boyer, Diego Aliaga, Lauriane L. J. Quéléver, Silvia Bucci, Hélène Angot, Lubna Dada, Benjamin Heutte, Lisa Beck, Marina Duetsch, Andreas Stohl, Ivo Beck, Tiia Laurila, Nina Sarnela, Roseline C. Thakur, Branka Miljevic, Markku Kulmala, Tuukka Petäjä, Mikko Sipilä, Julia Schmale, and Tuija Jokinen
Matthew Boyer, Diego Aliaga, Lauriane L. J. Quéléver, Silvia Bucci, Hélène Angot, Lubna Dada, Benjamin Heutte, Lisa Beck, Marina Duetsch, Andreas Stohl, Ivo Beck, Tiia Laurila, Nina Sarnela, Roseline C. Thakur, Branka Miljevic, Markku Kulmala, Tuukka Petäjä, Mikko Sipilä, Julia Schmale, and Tuija Jokinen

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Short summary
We analyze the seasonal cycle and sources of gases that are relevant for the formation of aerosol particles in the central Arctic. Since theses gases can form new particles, they can influence Arctic climate. We show that the sources of these gases are associated with changes in the Arctic environment during the year, especially with respect to sea ice. Therefore, the concentration of these gases will likely change in the future as the Arctic continues to warm.