Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/egusphere-2023-2863
https://doi.org/10.5194/egusphere-2023-2863
09 Jan 2024
 | 09 Jan 2024

Antarctic sensitivity to oceanic melting parameterizations

Antonio Juarez-Martinez, Javier Blasco, Alexander Robinson, Marisa Montoya, and Jorge Alvarez-Solas

Abstract. The Antarctic Ice Sheet (AIS) has experienced accelerated loss of ice over the last decades and could become the main contributor to sea-level rise in the coming centuries. However, the associated uncertainty is very large. The main sources of this uncertainty lie in the future scenarios, the climatic forcing and, most notably, the structural uncertainty due to our lack of understanding of ice-ocean interaction processes, in particular, the representation of sub-shelf basal melt. In this study, we use a higher-order ice-sheet model to investigate the impact of these three sources of uncertainty in the contribution of the AIS to sea level in the coming centuries in the context of the Ice Sheet Model Intercomparison Project (ISMIP6) but extending the projections until 2500. We test the sensitivity of the model to basal melting parameters using several forcings and scenarios simulated in the CMIP5 and CMIP6 ensembles. Results show a strong dependency on the values of the parameter that controls the heat exchange velocity between ice and ocean and also the forcing and scenario. Higher values of the heat exchange parameter lead to higher sea-level rise, with the contribution depending on the forcing-scenario configuration and reaching in some cases more than 3 metres by the end of 2500. Idealized simulations considering their individual effects have been performed, demonstrating that oceanic forcing plays a dominant role over the western sector of the AIS while atmospheric forcing is more important for the eastern sector and the interior.

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Antonio Juarez-Martinez, Javier Blasco, Alexander Robinson, Marisa Montoya, and Jorge Alvarez-Solas

Status: final response (author comments only)

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse
  • RC1: 'Comment on egusphere-2023-2863', Anonymous Referee #1, 12 Feb 2024
    • AC1: 'Reply on RC1', Antonio Juarez-Martinez, 30 Apr 2024
  • RC2: 'Comment on egusphere-2023-2863', Anonymous Referee #2, 04 Mar 2024
    • AC2: 'Reply on RC2', Antonio Juarez-Martinez, 30 Apr 2024
Antonio Juarez-Martinez, Javier Blasco, Alexander Robinson, Marisa Montoya, and Jorge Alvarez-Solas
Antonio Juarez-Martinez, Javier Blasco, Alexander Robinson, Marisa Montoya, and Jorge Alvarez-Solas

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Short summary
We present sea-level projections for Antarctica in the context of ISMIP6-2300 with several forcings, but extending the simulations until 2500, and showing that more than 3 metres of sea level contribution could be reached. We also test the sensitivity on a basal melting parameter and determine the timing of the loss of ice in the west region. All the simulations were carried out with the ice-sheet model Yelmo.