Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/egusphere-2023-913
https://doi.org/10.5194/egusphere-2023-913
11 May 2023
 | 11 May 2023

Next generation atmosphere-ocean climate modelling for storm surge hazard projections

Cléa Denamiel and Ivica Vilibić

Abstract. Due to on-going global warming, extreme storm surges are expected to threaten a greater number of coastal communities worldwide. However, global and regional climate simulations of extreme events are still not accurate enough to respond to the growing needs of the local decision makers to prepare for these rising hazards. We present a new approach using (sub-)kilometre-scale coupled atmosphere-ocean-wave models and demonstrate the feasibility to provide meter-scale assessments of the impact of climate change on storm surge hazards. As a proof of concept, we focus in the Adriatic Sea and analyse the sea levels of two kilometre-scale 31-year long simulations used in evaluation and extreme warming modes. First, we demonstrate that, at 1-km resolution, the model errors are reduced by up to a third compare to state-of-the-art regional and global models. Second, we show that meter-scale storm surge results – obtained by further downscaling extreme events extracted from the kilometre-scale simulations – contrast with the previously published literature. In particular, we found that some understudied regions of the Adriatic coast might be more vulnerable to sea level rise and atmospherically driven storm surges induced by extreme climate warming than the well-researched Venice Lagoon. Following these preliminary results, we present a newly developed methodology directly downscaling extreme events from global climate models. Within this framework, the numerical resources, previously spent to produce long-term simulations, are used efficiently to quantify the climate change uncertainty and to properly assess the meter-scale storm surge hazards.

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Cléa Denamiel and Ivica Vilibić

Status: closed

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse
  • RC1: 'Comment on egusphere-2023-913', Anonymous Referee #1, 21 Jul 2023
    • AC1: 'Reply on RC1', Clea Denamiel, 03 Oct 2023
  • RC2: 'Comment on egusphere-2023-913', Anonymous Referee #2, 25 Aug 2023
    • AC2: 'Reply on RC2', Clea Denamiel, 03 Oct 2023

Status: closed

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse
  • RC1: 'Comment on egusphere-2023-913', Anonymous Referee #1, 21 Jul 2023
    • AC1: 'Reply on RC1', Clea Denamiel, 03 Oct 2023
  • RC2: 'Comment on egusphere-2023-913', Anonymous Referee #2, 25 Aug 2023
    • AC2: 'Reply on RC2', Clea Denamiel, 03 Oct 2023
Cléa Denamiel and Ivica Vilibić

Data sets

Next-generation (sub-)kilometre-scale climate modelling for extreme storm-surge hazard projections Cléa Denamiel https://osf.io/2hgfm

Model code and software

AdriSC Climate Model: evaluation run Cléa Denamiel https://osf.io/zb3cm

Cléa Denamiel and Ivica Vilibić

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Latest update: 23 Jul 2024
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Short summary
We present a new methodology using coupled atmosphere-ocean-wave models and demonstrate the feasibility to provide meter scale assessments of the impact of climate change on storm surge hazards. We show that sea level variations and distributions can be derived at the climate scale in the Adriatic Sea small lagoons and bays. We expect that the newly developed methodology could lead to more targeted adaptation strategies in regions of the world vulnerable to atmospherically driven extreme events.