Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/egusphere-2023-370
https://doi.org/10.5194/egusphere-2023-370
15 Mar 2023
 | 15 Mar 2023

Analysis of the simulated feedbacks on large-scale ice sheets from ice-sheet climate interactions

Zhiang Xie and Dietmar Dommenget

Abstract. In study presented here we focus on the large climate-ice sheet feedbacks on global scales on time scales of 100,000 yrs. We conducted a series of idealised sensitivity experiments under CO2 and solar radiation reduction scenarios with the Globally Resolved Energy Balance - Ice Sheet Model v1.0 (GREB-ISM v1.0), to study the characteristics of five climate-ice sheet feedbacks, including albedo, snowfall, ice latent heat, topography and sea level feedbacks. We analysed the relative importance of each of these feedbacks on the ice sheet growth and on the climate system (surface temperature). The results indicate that the inclusion of ice sheets will delay the response to the external forcing and facilitate the climate cooling in the high latitude and altitude areas in the Northern Hemisphere, but also causes a small amount of warming elsewhere, due to the blocking of atmospheric heat transport. As for individual feedbacks, the albedo feedback is the most dominant positive feedback in favour of ice sheet build-up and cooler climates, whereas snowfall feedback is the greatest negative feedback that reduces the growth of ice sheets. The large ice latent heat required to melt ice allows to maintain ice sheets from one cold seasons to the next and therefore provides a positive feedback for ice sheet growth. The ice sheets impact on the topography is also a positive feedback but with smaller impact than the albedo feedback. The sea level change influences ice sheets by shifting their location, in particular allowing ice sheets growth in the Arctic Ocean, while reducing it over central north Asia.

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Zhiang Xie and Dietmar Dommenget

Interactive discussion

Status: closed

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse
  • RC1: 'Comment on egusphere-2023-370', Mario Krapp, 12 Apr 2023
    • AC1: 'Reply to RC1 and RC2', Zhiang Xie, 03 Jul 2023
  • RC2: 'Comment on egusphere-2023-370', Anonymous Referee #2, 27 Apr 2023
    • AC1: 'Reply to RC1 and RC2', Zhiang Xie, 03 Jul 2023
  • AC2: 'Manuscript with trace tracking', Zhiang Xie, 03 Jul 2023

Interactive discussion

Status: closed

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse
  • RC1: 'Comment on egusphere-2023-370', Mario Krapp, 12 Apr 2023
    • AC1: 'Reply to RC1 and RC2', Zhiang Xie, 03 Jul 2023
  • RC2: 'Comment on egusphere-2023-370', Anonymous Referee #2, 27 Apr 2023
    • AC1: 'Reply to RC1 and RC2', Zhiang Xie, 03 Jul 2023
  • AC2: 'Manuscript with trace tracking', Zhiang Xie, 03 Jul 2023
Zhiang Xie and Dietmar Dommenget
Zhiang Xie and Dietmar Dommenget

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Short summary
Using numeric modelling, the global interaction between the climate system and ice sheets are examined in this study. The results show the existence of ice sheets slows the response of the climate system to external forcings and enhances the response in high latitude in Northern Hemisphere. Some interactions amplify the climate response, such as the ice-albedo, ice latent heat and topography feedbacks, while others damp or shift the climate response, such as snowfall and sea level feedbacks.