Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/egusphere-2022-588
https://doi.org/10.5194/egusphere-2022-588
 
06 Jul 2022
06 Jul 2022

Where does the dust deposited over the Sierra Nevada snow come from?

Huilin Huang1, Yun Qian1, Ye Liu1, Cenlin He2, Jianyu Zheng3,4, Zhibo Zhang3,4, and Antonis Gkikas5 Huilin Huang et al.
  • 1Atmospheric Sciences and Global Change Division, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA, USA
  • 2Research Applications Laboratory, National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO, USA
  • 3Department of Physics, University of Maryland Baltimore County, Baltimore, MD, USA
  • 4Joint Center for Earth Systems Technology, University of Maryland Baltimore County, Baltimore, MD, USA
  • 5Institute for Astronomy, Astrophysics, Space Applications and Remote Sensing, National Observatory of Athens, Athens, Greece

Abstract. Mineral dust contributes up to one-half of surface aerosol loading in spring over the southwestern U.S., posing an environmental challenge that threatens human health and the ecosystem. Using the self-organizing map (SOM) analysis, we identify four typical dust transport patterns across the Sierra Nevada, associated with the mesoscale winds, Sierra-Block-Jets (SBJ), North-Pacific-High (NPH), and long-range cross-Pacific westerlies, respectively. We find dust emitted from the Central Valley is persistently transported eastward, while dust from the Mojave Desert and Great Basin influences the Sierra Nevada during mesoscale transport occurring mostly in the winter and early spring. Asian dust reaching the mountain range comes either from the west through straight isobars (cross-Pacific transport) or from the north in the presence of NPH. Extensive dust depositions are found on the west slope of the mountain, contributed by Central Valley emissions and cross-Pacific remote transport. Especially, the SBJ-related transport produces deposition through landfalling atmospheric rivers, whose frequency might increase in a warming climate.

Huilin Huang et al.

Status: closed

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse
  • RC1: 'Comment on egusphere-2022-588', Anonymous Referee #1, 20 Jul 2022
  • RC2: 'Comment on egusphere-2022-588', Anonymous Referee #2, 01 Aug 2022
  • AC1: 'Comment on egusphere-2022-588', Huilin Huang, 26 Sep 2022

Status: closed

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse
  • RC1: 'Comment on egusphere-2022-588', Anonymous Referee #1, 20 Jul 2022
  • RC2: 'Comment on egusphere-2022-588', Anonymous Referee #2, 01 Aug 2022
  • AC1: 'Comment on egusphere-2022-588', Huilin Huang, 26 Sep 2022

Huilin Huang et al.

Data sets

Data for "Where does the dust deposited over the Sierra Nevada snow come from?" Huilin Huang https://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.6795994

Huilin Huang et al.

Viewed

Total article views: 462 (including HTML, PDF, and XML)
HTML PDF XML Total BibTeX EndNote
327 122 13 462 3 7
  • HTML: 327
  • PDF: 122
  • XML: 13
  • Total: 462
  • BibTeX: 3
  • EndNote: 7
Views and downloads (calculated since 06 Jul 2022)
Cumulative views and downloads (calculated since 06 Jul 2022)

Viewed (geographical distribution)

Total article views: 415 (including HTML, PDF, and XML) Thereof 415 with geography defined and 0 with unknown origin.
Country # Views %
  • 1
1
 
 
 
 
Latest update: 29 Nov 2022
Download
Short summary
Using a clustering method developed in the field of artificial neural networks, we identify four typical dust transport patterns across the Sierra Nevada, associated with the mesoscale and regional scale wind circulations. Our results highlight the connection between dust transport and dominant weather patterns, which can be used to understand dust transport in a changing climate.